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Rendall Coleby Dating Due to her preference to keep her work in the limelight, Rendall Coleby has not revealed Boyfriend name or relationship status at the moment. We are currently in process of looking up information on the previous dates and hookups. Who is he dating right now? According to our records, Mark Rendall is possibly single. Relationships. Mark Rendall has been in a relationship with Ellen Page (2008 - 2009).. About. Mark Rendall is a 31 year old Canadian Actor. Born on 21st October, 1988 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, he is famous for Year of the Carnivore in a career that spans 2000 – 2014 and 2000–present. Rendall Coleby is single. She is not dating anyone currently. Rendall had at least 1 relationship in the past. Rendall Coleby has not been previously engaged. She is from London, England. She has a brother. According to our records, she has no children. Like many celebrities and famous people, Rendall keeps her personal and love life private. Rendall Munroe is single. He is not dating anyone currently. Rendall had at least 1 relationship in the past. Rendall Munroe has not been previously engaged. He has sons named Tiela and Tier ell. According to our records, he has no children. Like many celebrities and famous people, Rendall keeps his personal and love life private. Who is Rendall Coleby dating? Rendall Coleby is currently single, according to our records.. The Instagram Star was born in London, England on April 5, 2001. Also known by her username tfrtc, she is a popular Instagram user with 440,000 followers. Who is Randall Cunningham dating? Randall Cunningham is currently married to Felicity De Jager. The couple started dating in 1993 and have been together for around 27 years, 4 months, and 29 days. The American Football Player was born in Santa Barbara on March 27, 1963. Star NFL quarterback who played for the Philadelphia Eagles from 1985 to 1995.

Inside James Dyson’s Costly Decision to Kill His Electric Car

2019.10.17 10:21 acerod1 Inside James Dyson’s Costly Decision to Kill His Electric Car

James Dyson, the billionaire British inventor and entrepreneur, is standing on a small stage at the mid-September gala opening of his new flagship retail store in Paris. The space is more high-end art gallery than appliance mart: matte black walls and ceiling, gray tile floors, and stylish gadgets displayed like sculptures, spotlighted on white-topped plinths.
Dyson, spry and lanky at 72 years old, is wearing owlish blue-frame glasses and a copper-toned, thigh-length jacket evocative of a mad scientist’s lab coat. In his cut-glass English accent he’s running through his company’s latest wares: a hair dryer that uses circular airflow to avoid heat damage; a hair styler that wraps curls using a vortex of air; a bladeless oval air purifier that blows hot and cold; a combination water faucet and hand dryer. The list goes on, ending, inevitably, with a cordless vacuum cleaner, the category consumers most closely associate with Dyson’s name.
For all the eye-catching design and technological wonder of Dyson’s body of work, many in the audience are hoping he’ll make a pronouncement about the one much-discussed Dyson product that’s not yet for sale. Then the great man utters the words they’ve longed to hear: “the car.” He flicks to an aerial photograph, not of an automobile, but of the former Royal Air Force base in rural England where his team has been working in great secrecy to design an electric vehicle. “That’s about all I’ll say about the car this evening,” he declares. True to his word, he pivots to rhapsodizing about an LED lamp designed by his 47-year-old son and heir apparent, Jake.
Within weeks, the reason behind Dyson’s reticence becomes clear: He had already decided the car project was doomed. In fact, while he was exuberantly peddling vacuums and hair stylers, his bankers were unsuccessfully scrambling to find a buyer for the electric vehicle program to which Dyson had committed four years, hundreds of engineers, and 2 billion pounds ($2.5 billion). On Oct. 10, Dyson said his privately held company would cease work on the project, ending his electric car dreams before the first model ever rolled off the assembly line.
BUNKER MENTALITY: Reminders of World War II, like this hangar, remain at the former air base, where Dyson prototyped its doomed car.COURTESY OF DYSONIt was a gutsy decision and a rare public setback for Dyson, who, with his family, owns the entirety of the company that bears his name. He had put his estimable reputation on the line with the car, promising a “radically different” vehicle that would feature “revolutionary” battery technology while outperforming more experienced competitors. And he had promised to have it in customers’ hands by 2021, a dramatically short time frame for a neophyte automaker. In the end, a chagrined Dyson says the decision came down to a simple business proposition. “It just wasn’t commercially viable,” he said, in an exclusive interview with _Fortune_the day after news broke of the car’s demise. Although Dyson’s crack auto team successfully created an innovative new car, he wasn’t willing to price it below cost, as he believes the competition is doing. “It’s a tragedy, really, because our engineers have done a brilliant job.”
Dyson’s inability to produce a profitable automobile speaks volumes about the current perilous state of the electric vehicle industry, in which companies like Elon Musk’s Tesla and Chinese startup Nio are burning through billions of dollars annually with no sign of black ink on the horizon. The story of his audacious but ultimately failed project also says much about Dyson, the rare executive who can combine blue-sky dreaming with steely-eyed financial discipline. At a time when every company speaks about innovation and disruption, Dyson’s decision to kill his electric car is a case study in the delicate balancing act of embracing ingenuity while keeping an eye on profits.
Improbable though it seems in retrospect, there were good reasons for James Dyson to attempt to make an all-electric automobile. Electrification presented a once-in-a-century opportunity in the auto industry, one that Dyson was not alone in spotting. Electric powertrains require only about 20 moving parts compared with more than 2,000 for cars with internal combustion engines—a fact that theoretically lowers barriers to entry. What’s more, Tesla had caught the global automotive industry sleeping on EVs, and several years ago, it looked as if there was room for more entrants. Apple was rumored to be working on a car, for example, as was Google. “Anybody can build an electric car,” veteran automotive analyst Maryann Keller says. “It’s an open playing field.”
Dyson thought he had a better shot than most. His company was thriving, with 2018 sales jumping 25% to a record $5.6 billion. Pretax operating profits topped $1 billion for the first time, driven by strong demand in Asia, where Dyson is a status-conferring consumer brand. Through its vacuums, Dyson’s company already was a global leader in electric motors. It knew batteries too, thanks to its cordless products. Key EV concepts like airflow and climate control also were present in all of Dyson’s appliances. “When we realized, almost by accident, that we had the technology to build an electric car, it was natural to go into it,” Dyson says. Back in 2015, when he first conceived of it, Dyson says there seemed to be ample room in the market for a chassis-to-moonroof rethink of what an EV should be. “You have to remember that four or five years ago, only Tesla was on the scene,” he says. “So it was a very different sort of environment.”
The inventor had made a career of proving skeptics wrong. He’d successfully reimagined one mundane household product after another, starting with an innovative wheelbarrow in 1974. He’d made his name and fortune with the bagless vacuum cleaner, which used a “cyclone” effect to draw dust out of the air. Launched in 1993, the vacuums featured a transparent bin that let you see exactly how much dust you’d sucked up. (He famously overruled marketing experts who told him no one would buy a vacuum that showcased the dirt.) New models included advancements such as ball-like handle attachments for maneuvering into tight corners. Slim cordless uprights were made possible by the company’s electric motor research. Dyson was also adept at extending his expertise into new categories, like the Airblade hand dryer as well as bladeless fans and air purifiers.
While a car may have looked like a leap, ­Dyson had been building up to designing one for years, in part because of a hankering to invent a solution for the pollution-spewing internal combustion engine. Affronted by the smell and smoke from diesel engines, in the late 1980s and early 1990s he developed a filter for the particulate belched by trucks, based on technology used in his bagless vacuum. But trucking companies refused to buy it, he says, because they didn’t want to have to empty the filter. He also blames U.K. and European regulators who insisted that diesel was “green and clean,” despite abundant scientific evidence of ill-health effects. “There was a sort of jilted feeling,” he says, acknowledging his search for new technology “has been lurking” ever since. Grand projects have been started for shakier reasons.

James Dyson

At 72, the British inventor has been innovating his whole adult life. His contraptions span from gardening to hair styling.

Inventor

Dyson’s first hit came in 1974, a redesigned wheelbarrow that replaced the typical narrow rubber wheel with a plastic sphere that resisted sinking into muddy ground. He called it the ­Ballbarrow.
Dyson then turned his attention to the bagless vacuum. It took a decade and 5,127 prototypes to perfect his design for the product that ultimately would make his name and fortune.

Environmentalist

Dyson has been worked up about pollution for decades, but not out of concern for global warming. He loathed the exhaust spewed into the air by diesel-burning engines popular in Europe. “I hated the smell,” he says. “I hated the black smoke.”
He developed a filter to capture diesel particulates but couldn’t persuade trucking companies to buy it. His dislike of fossil-fuel burning engines persisted.

Landowner, philanthropist, patriot

Aside from his day job, Dyson runs a profitable agriculture business. He owns more farmland than anyone else in the U.K., including Queen Elizabeth II.
His James Dyson Foundation runs an annual award program in 27 countries, in search of the most innovative inventions. To train more U.K. engineers, he founded the James Dyson Institute, which offers undergraduates free engineering degrees and work experience.
He also likes to display the work of other British inventors on the grounds of his company’s corporate campus in rural Wiltshire, 100 miles west of London. A Brexit supporter, Dyson had critics who chafed at his plans to relocate HQ to Singapore.

Secret Keeper

Dyson is a 14,000-person company whose paranoia for protecting corporate secrets, dating back to piracy of the Ballbarrow’s design, rivals Apple’s. It is an active litigant on its patent portfolio, having tussled with the likes of Hoover and Samsung.Employees generally operate on a “need to know” basis and are expected not to discuss projects outside their teams, including in communal cafeterias.
Work on the top-secret car program began in earnest in 2015, as Dyson recruited auto industry veterans from Aston Martin and Jaguar Land Rover. The company is accustomed to operating clandestinely. Bitter experience from Dyson’s earliest days as an inventor, when he says a competitor pinched his wheelbarrow design, taught the entrepreneur to be paranoid. Products inside the company are known only by a number until they are publicly unveiled. (An early version of the doomed car was called “N526.”) Fingerprint scanners control access to labs.
But this time the secret got out. The U.K. government accidentally revealed Dyson’s work on an electric car in an industrial strategy report it published online. That, and the increasing scale of the endeavor—which included a 200-million-pound refurbishment of the old RAF airfield to serve as the design and testing hub for the car and the hiring of hundreds of people—forced Dyson to come clean. In September 2017, he held a press conference in London to officially announce the project, saying he was committing 2 billion pounds to the endeavor, including 1 billion aimed at producing a breakthrough in battery technology.
Automotive experts thought the sum was paltry compared with what would be needed to build a car. But it was orders of magnitude bigger than anything Dyson had ever spent on a new product. Its Supersonic hair dryer, for instance, which it launched in 2016, had taken four years and cost $71 million to develop. Many also doubted Dyson’s premise that its technical know-how would transfer to electric cars. “An electric vehicle is not just a big hair dryer,” says George Crabtree, director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Joint Center for Energy Storage Research at the Argonne National Laboratory.
Dyson was undeterred. The company was committed to rethinking the car from first principles—a philosophy that had underpinned Dyson’s success in household products. “We wanted to change everything and not use other people’s architectural layout,” Dyson says. The company would design all its components in-house, from motors to windshield wipers. “If you look at the way other auto companies operate, they treat components as black boxes,” says Andrew Clothier, Dyson’s director of technical research. They buy parts off the shelf and bolt them together. That’s cheaper and faster but comes at the expense of innovation, he says. Dyson would try a completely different approach. (Tesla also designs its own electric motors, battery packs, and chargers.)
The car Dyson’s team came up with was about the size of a Range Rover but with a longer wheelbase; a lower roofline; and a short, stubbed nose leading to a dramatically sloped windscreen, according to patent filings made public in May. Dyson says now the long wheelbase was necessary to accommodate a very large battery pack that would have given the car more range than any EV currently on the market. The tires were taller and narrower than usual too. That reduced rolling resistance as well as accommodating more interior space and, by allowing for lower tire pressure, provided a more comfortable ride. “We were after aerodynamic efficiency, rolling resistance efficiency, electric motor efficiency, and battery efficiency,” Dyson says.
Every EV on the road today uses “wet” ­lithium-ion batteries, in which a cathode made of lithium mixed with other metals (usually nickel, manganese, and cobalt) is separated from a graphite anode by an electrolyte solution. These cells are efficient but take time to charge and are prone to catching fire. Dyson thought he could gain an edge by using solid-state batteries instead. Such batteries, which replace the liquid electrolyte with a ceramic material and use a pure lithium metal anode, are the Holy Grail for EVs. They pack more power for their weight, meaning they would vastly extend the car’s range. They also charge far faster and are much safer.
Last year, Dyson selected Singapore as the site for his future EV factory. The company already made its other products in neighboring Malaysia, and it saw the region as a key potential market for the car. Then, earlier this year, Dyson announced it would shift its global corporate headquarters to Singapore too. The founder bought a $54 million penthouse apartment in the city-state. Tabloids leveled accusations of betrayal at the entrepreneur, who had called for a revival of British industrial prowess and is a prominent proponent of Brexit, the U.K.’s decision to leave the European Union. Dyson notes he continues to employ 5,000 people in the U.K.
All along, James Dyson knew this project was likely to be harder than any he’d attempted previously. And that was before automakers like General Motors, Volkswagen, and others committed wholeheartedly to EVs. He knew that he’d have to spend a lot of money and that without a dealer network, he would have to rely on direct sales through digital channels, much like Tesla, and find a way to support and service the cars in the aftermarket. But he was unprepared for just how tough the task would prove to be.
Most daunting was the competition. European and Chinese regulatory moves to ban gas engines in coming decades acted as a catalyst for major automakers. Together, they are expected to pump $300 billion into electric car development in the next decade. Suddenly, Dyson’s team faced a financial reckoning just as it was time to begin installing manufacturing equipment in Singapore. “Doing everything from scratch probably put up the cost,” Dyson reflects. He also says that because the company could not guarantee high volumes, it could not strike the best deals with suppliers, as it had throughout decades of building appliances. And, without revealing any details, he admits the battery that the company wanted to use was more expensive than industry standards.
Dyson always knew his car wouldn’t be cheap. He had previously joked to reporters that it might be more appropriate to talk about the size of the down payment required to buy one rather than the sticker price. But there’s expensive, and then there’s exorbitant. If his EV were to turn a profit, it would have to enter the market “right at the top end,” Dyson says. While he declines to reveal the price the company was considering, the Tesla Model X starts at about $104,000, and Faraday Future, a Chinese-backed startup in California, is planning to launch an ultraluxury SUV that may cost as much as $180,000. “It’s a price where we could sell some but not enough,” Dyson says.
A NOT-SO-SIMPLE PLAN: Patent applications hint at what a Dyson car might have looked like.Courtesy of DysonAt the end of the day, Dyson didn’t blink at the “sunk costs” of capital already invested in the car project. “It wasn’t the investment at all,” he says. “We’d already committed that.” Fiscally conservative, Dyson says he would never consider putting his company in financial jeopardy for the sake of his car. At the end of 2018, Dyson’s debt was a manageable 368 million pounds ($492 million), most of it long term. He refused to overleverage Dyson or take it public, which would dilute his control. “We don’t have endless shareholders’ money or the potential to raise shareholders’ money,” he says. “We’re a family business.”
Dyson says he focused on “the BAM”—the build and materials cost—of the car and therefore where he’d have to price it to earn an acceptable margin. What worried Dyson wasn’t the billions competitors were investing in EVs; it was their willingness to sell cars at a loss. Sam Abuelsamid, an analyst who tracks the EV sector for the consulting firm Navigant, says the break-even price for a generic electric car is about $80,000. Mercedes, BMW, and Jaguar all have electric luxury SUVs entering the market this year with a starting price of around $70,000. And Tesla and Nio are selling mass-market electric cars at half that price. (Tesla’s burn rate hit an annual pace of $3.5 billion in 2018—more than Dyson had pledged to its entire EV project.) Dyson feared his EV would look even pricier in comparison.
Once before, Dyson had faced a similar dilemma. In November 2000, the company unveiled a washing machine called the Contrarotator. The ingenious design had two drums that spun in opposite directions. But, as with the car, Dyson says, the company’s novel design and low volumes gave it little leverage with suppliers. “I worked out it cost at least two-and-half times more to make than a conventional washing machine,” he says. Ultimately, Dyson sold the washers for about 1,000 pounds ($1,500 at the time), at least 30% more than competitors’, and even then it lost money on every one. Eventually, in 2005, the company decided to discontinue it. Dyson vowed never to sell a product below cost again.
Before deciding to abandon the car, Dyson hired bankers to try to sell the division. They approached “all the people you might imagine,” says Dyson. (The _Financial Times_reported Jaguar Land Rover was among them.) No one bit. “We didn’t really get close to anyone,” he says. In late September, Dyson made the fateful decision to pull the plug.
Killing fledgling products actually isn’t that unusual for Dyson. “It’s heartbreaking,” says Stephen Courtney, Dyson’s concept director. “But it is sort of the nature of working in research.” Normally, the buttoned-up company fails privately and quietly. With the EV, competitors, gearheads, battery experts, and business journalists were scrutinizing its every move. “It was the hardest decision we’ve ever had to make,” says Dyson. “So many designers and engineers have put so much effort into it, and it hadn’t seen the light of day.” The company plans to find roles elsewhere for as many as possible of the 523 employees who worked on the car. But there won’t be room for all of them.
ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF DYSON
Dyson’s 67-acre corporate campus in Malmesbury, about 100 miles west of London, is sprinkled with iconic examples of ingenious industrial design, among them an original Alec Issigonis–designed Mini Cooper, bisected to show off its clever use of interior space; a Honda Super Cub motorcycle; and two British fighter jets. One day a prototype of Dyson’s electric car may join them. In the meantime, there are already hints that the company’s automotive efforts won’t be wasted.
In a windowless industrial shed being constructed behind Dyson’s striking mirrored-glass D9 research lab, the company has built the largest advanced prototyping lab for solid-state batteries in Europe. Beyond EVs, solid-state batteries have potential uses in everything from mobile phones to consumer electronics to aircraft. And Dyson says it will continue its investment in them. “We think we’ve got something that is groundbreaking and revolutionary,” says Mike Rendall, Dyson’s head of energy storage industrialization. Called D9A, the new battery prototyping facility should enable Dyson “to bring solid-state batteries to market as soon as possible,” Rendall says.
The company is also investing heavily in robotics with uses beyond automobiles. Inside a section of the secretive D9 building, a team of 65 robotics researchers are working on machinery, much of it hidden under tarps for a journalist’s visit. It is clear from what little is visible—like the big brown armchair, curiously perched on a table, upon which sits something big under a sheet—that it is not simply an evolution of its existing robot vacuum cleaner, the Dyson’s 360 Eye. Dyson’s director of robotics research, Vincent Clerc, previously led SoftBank’s design of its humanoid robots ­Pepper and Romeo. Is Dyson developing a fully humanoid robot butler or maid? Clerc won’t say, although he allows that the company is focused on getting robots to perceive the world in three dimensions.
The day after canceling the car, Dyson seems subdued but philosophical. “There’s lots of exciting stuff,” he says of his product pipeline, including gadgets that may benefit from the automotive research. “And the silver lining of this horrible decision is we can concentrate on those.” Dyson may have missed his chance to beat rival billionaire Elon Musk. But the inventor seems eager to get back to the lab and put his name on yet another breakthrough product.
A version of this article appears in the November 2019 issue of Fortune with the headline “James Dyson’s Electric Shock.”### More must-read stories from Fortune:
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](https://fortune.com/2019/10/08/trump-china-tariffs-trade-war-us-economy-impact/)—Inside JP Morgan, moving on from WeWork is proving to be a messy proposition
—5 beermakers to watch from [2019’s Great American Beer Festival
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2018.04.26 03:08 choojo444 Brick Wall: Mary Flett Marwick

This is one of my earliest brick walls and maybe all it requires is a ancestry world subscription, but I am pretty stumped.
According to her grave stone Mary Flett Marwick was born October 10th 1831 and died Feb 16th 1896. She, along with her husband and 5 children immigrated from Scotland to Canada to Kansas about 1883. Family search has their marriage record and the birth records for all 5 of their children born between 1864 and 1875 all in Evie & Rendall, Orkney, Scotland (all attached to her FS profile if you want to see them all).
Below is her obituary:
I'm not sure if Tibett is really her middle name or if it's a butchering of Flett. There is a 1871 Scotland census of her family I was able to pull off of some one else's tree during my ancestry trial (the tree was a disaster but the census was good) which gives her birth place as Orphir, Orkney and year as abt 1832. (edited to add year)
The problem I'm running into is that familysearch seems to have pretty good birth records for Orkney around that time but, while several Mary Fletts were born around the time frame none were born on the date listed on her tombstone. The best option I have is this Mary Flett born in the same year, but on a totally different date. Not sure if anyone can help or give suggestions about how to figure out where she came from? Maybe the scottish censuses on ancestry could help? Thanks in advance for any help!
EDIT: Thanks everyone for your advice and info. I did pay for the marriage record here and it seems like she doesn't match any of the recorded births. Her parents are apparently James and Jane (Firth?) Flett
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2017.06.25 21:27 LilyWright3 Secrets Part II

(( Directly after this post ))
“So for exactly how long were you planning on keeping a child secret from us, Lady Hayford?” Lord Hogg asked.
Laisa was sitting in the Great Hall, a goblet of water next to her, trying to clear her pounding headache.
She had resumed a dead stare above the heads of the small army that had gathered in the hall, weariness finally taking its toll.
“It is late, perhaps this isn’t the time. We could continue this discuss when we are all of brighter and well rested spirits,” suggested Rendal Hogg.
“No, I called for an audience, and I see no reason why not to conduct these affairs now.” Carrel said, folding his arms in front of his chest, “But I do not se why we must remain out here. I would be perfectly fine with speaking with you, My Lady, in your study or your solar.”
“The Hall is a fine a place as any.” Laisa responded.
It was full of gossiping servants and guards, but that’s how she wanted it. She took a drink, and nearly spat out the water. It was hard to drink anything but wine at this point.
“So is the child your…your natural child?” Hogg asked.
Her eyes flickered so Tavion, who was standing on the side, head tilted down.
“That child was not born out of wedlock. He is no bastard.” Laisa said with a decided coolness.
Faces of confusion spread across parts of her court, and she took another drink. “And may I ask who the father is?” Lord Hogg simpered.
A silence filled the room for a moment, and Laisa’s eyes did not stray from the doorframe to the hall. It was chipped and cracking in places-she would need to get that fixed.
“I am.”
Tavion’s voice filled the silence, and with it, more stunned faces coming from particularly from House Hogg.
“However-” he paused, and looked up to Laisa, and she gave him a tiny nod.
“Lady Laisa is not the mother.” He continued.
“My sister, Nira, is.” Laisa finished.
“You-she-” Hogg stammered, and even Rendal seemed a little lost for words.
Tavion launched into an explanation, of his love for Nira, and them realizing she was pregnant. How they got married, under Laisa’s permission, and in secret stayed away from the keep, waving away questions about Nira’s growth. Once they returned, they gave the explanation Nira had fallen ill, and was bed-ridden.
The child was born only days before Nira left for the Red Keep and had remained a secret per Nira’s own request.
“So-Nira is married, to him?” Hogg demanded, “A common born man, when she was promised to my son?”
Laisa and Tavion shared glances of confusion.
“Nira was never promised to anybody, my Lord.” Laisa said with an edge to her voice.
“There was to be a marriage between your sister and my eldest son. That was what we agreed on.” His voice was raised, and she was sure he was going to wake the entire castle, “But I suppose betrothals mean little to one such as yourself. You and your family have not been known to keep them before.”
She could feel the anger rising in her. That slight had hit closer to home than she wanted it to.
“But there was no betrothal agreed upon between our kin.” Her voice was tight, “Nira and Tavion were in love and with child. Politically yes, it may not have been the smartest move, hence why it was kept under wraps. But I sought to keep her happy, and I would hate to be the one to separate them. If there had been an arrangement made, of course matters would be different.”
A memory floated in her mind, of a time where Lord Hogg had tried to pressure herself into a marriage with his son. She had made an off-hand comment then, that the Hogg child might be better suited for Nira. But Hogg was twisting her words, and she could feel anger stir inside of her, not helped by the amount of drink she had consumed.
Lord Hogg straighten to his full height, “These people are all people you can trust, and yet you betray them by hiding things, keeping secrets, and breaking promises? House Hayford preaches loyalty and honor, but do you truly have none of your own? You have lead us down a false path, following the bastard King, and now bowing meekly at the usurper.” His voice rang through the hall, “Now I understand how hard it must be for you, to sit at the seat of rule alone. But now you have rejected the help of your council, choosing to keep us in the dark.”
She understood his words and actions now. He wasn’t misremembering anything, it was a ploy to slander her in front of her people. And it seemed to be working. Mutters could be heard throughout the hall following his words. Lord Hogg had a moving voice.
Tavion drew his sword, “You dare disrespect My Lady in such a way?”
He made a flourish of his hand towards Tavion, “Now, is this the true courtesy of House Hayford? Opinions, met with threats?”
“Stand down, Tavion.” Laisa said, her voice calm.
“But-”
“That’s an order.”
“Too cowardly to stand up for yourself, or is it you know I am right?” Lord Hogg snapped.
He was trying to goad her into rage. And it was working. Her hands gripped her cup, shaking slightly. He could present her as unstable, and unfit to rule.
It had certainly worked before.
She took another drink, and placed the goblet down. She looked at her vassal straight on.
It would be easy to fly into a blind rage, but she couldn’t do that. No, she had to be better than that.
All her life she had to fight to be taken seriously, to prove herself as a competent leader. While others could flail around and yell and scream, she had kept her emotions in check, for the most part. She could not afford to be hysterical. She could not indulge in anger.
She had to be better.
“I’m sorry you feel that way, Lord Carrel. My intent was never to deceive, or to harm. I wish you had come to me we these concerns sooner, or expressed an interest in such affairs, as you are doing now. The decision to keep Nira and Tavion’s marriage and child a secret was made between myself and my sister. It was never intended to be a long-term thing, and we were going to have a council about it after the child was born. However, certain complications rose, as I am sure you’re aware of, and I didn’t wish to act without her.” She explained.
She sat straight in her chair, looking down at Hogg, “Concerning any such marriage agreement, to my knowledge no such thing was discussed. No formal arrangement was made, and I am afraid you are mistaken in that fact. And I am sure both Nira and your son can attest to this fact as well.”
She took a look around the hall, and then rested her gaze back on Hogg. “Are we in agreement, then?”
“I-” he faltered a moment, “I understand.”
“You have been a good vassal in such turbulent times. I am sorry for the harm I may have caused in my choices in the war. But I do not regret them. You came here with the promise of assistance, and loyalty, and you did not disappoint. But trust needs to go both ways. In the future, I want to be committed into keeping an open keep, with no more secrets between us. Can I get that promise from you?”
Hogg’s mouth drew into a straight line, “Yes, of course.”
“Good,” she smiled, and glanced upwards to see how everyone else was faring. Looks of uncertainly were still present in people’s faces, and she knew she needed to give a show of strength. While though she could not be aggressive, she could not sit back and remain passive.
“However-”
Lord Hogg looked back at her, eyebrows raised.
“I will not suffer slights at my House. When you say such things, it hurts everybody here. We have provided you and your kin with hospitality for nearly a year now, and this is how you repay us? With accusations of falsehoods and dishonor? I yearn for the chance to prove you wrong, but I shouldn’t have to. I urge you to think carefully before you next speak, my Lord. I give you nothing but trust, and I expect the same from you.”
“I-” he started, but Laisa cut him off.
“Now, every here is tired, and it is late in the night. Any further concerns we can discuss at a later date. You are dismissed.”
He closed his mouth, and gave a quick bow, before moving upstairs to his chambers, trailed by a few of his guard.
His son, Olivar, lingered a few moments longer. He shot a glance up at Laisa, and quickly followed his father.
She rose, and was helped down by one of her guards. She looked at Tavion, and gave him a silent apology, and a promise to speak with him later.
Rendal remained quiet, but quickly returned to his duties.
Before she returned upstairs, she took a final glance, wondering how her citizens would react. They seemed in better spirits, but doubt still remained.
She would send Tavion with a message to her sister about what had transpired, and hoped that she wouldn’t be too upset.
The only good thing about tonight was Laisa finally felt truly exhausted, and eager to get sleep.
There was still a strange emptiness inside of her when she finally settled down. Some of Hogg’s words had struck a nerve.
But she closed her eyes, and prayed that sleep would come for her quickly.
submitted by LilyWright3 to IronThroneRP [link] [comments]


2017.06.23 23:02 vAltyR47 The Big List of Clarinet Music

The List.
I just posted this in the sticky thread about the solo list being down, but I thought it deserved its own post.
The book "The Clarinet: Some Notes on Its History and Construction" by F. Geoffrey Rendall has a fairly comprehensive list of repertoire. I just finished transcribing it into a digital format. I caught a few missing works, which I added, but I'm sure there's more, so feel free to comment with additions. (or even better, fork the file and send me a pull request!)
I'm hoping to add composition dates, more method and etude books, as well as convert this into a spreadsheet, but I think this is a good enough to post.
EDIT: Through the magic of text processing and Google Doc's import function, here it is in spreadsheet form.
submitted by vAltyR47 to Clarinet [link] [comments]


2017.06.20 08:04 tombstoneshadows28 All of the MPAA/CARA-rated films of 2012 (out of the 8,309 films released worldwide that year.)

G
  1. Chasing Rodriguez (Director: Jeff Mosley)
  2. Journey To The Christmas Star (Director: Nils Gaup)
  3. Life’s A Jungle: Africa’s Most Wanted (Director: Robert D. Hanna)
  4. Little Brother, Big Trouble: A Christmas Adventure (Directors: Kari Juusonen, Jørgen Lerdam)
  5. Santa Paws 2: The Santa Pups (Director: Robert Vince)
  6. Secret Of The Wings (Directors: Roberts Gannaway + Peggy Holmes)
  7. The Oogieloves In The Big Balloon Adventure (Director: Matthew Diamond)
  8. This Shining Light (Directors: Keith Oncale + Shawn Washburn)
  9. Vampire Dog (Director: Geoff Anderson)
  10. Wings (Director: Olga Lopato)
  11. Zambezia (Director: Wayne Thornley)
PG
  1. 12 Dogs Of Christmas: Great Puppy Rescue (Director: Kieth Merrill)
  2. 16-Love (Director: Adam Lipsius)
  3. 40 Point Plan (Director: Eric. W. Williams)
  4. Abel’s Field (Director: Gordie Haakstad)
  5. Adventure Planet (Director: Kompin Kemgumnird)
  6. AquaTales (Directors: Ivan Oneka + Gorka Vázquezj)
  7. Back To The Sea (Director: Thom Lu)
  8. Backwards (Director: Ben Hickernell)
  9. Big Miracle (Director: Ken Kwapis)
  10. Bol Bachchan (Director: Rohit Shetty)
  11. Brave (Directors: Mark Andrews, Brenda Chapman + Steve Purcell)
  12. Champions Of The Deep (Director: Baxter Churchville)
  13. Charly 10th Anniversary Encore (Director: Adam Thomas Anderegg)
  14. Chasing Mavericks (Directors: Michael Apted + Curtis Hanson)
  15. Cheerful Weather For The Wedding (Director: Donal Rice)
  16. Chick Magnets (Director: Brian Douros)
  17. Christmas Oranges (Director: John Lyde)
  18. Cinderella 3D (Director: Pascal Hérold)
  19. Cinnamon (Director: Jordi Mariscal)
  20. Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away (Director: Andrew Adamson)
  21. Cole Younger & The Black Train (Director: Christopher Forbes)
  22. Cowgirls ‘n Angels (Director: Timothy Armstrong)
  23. Crazy Enough (Director: Lance McDaniel)
  24. Delhi Safari (Director: Nikkhil Advani)
  25. Derby Dogs (Director: Tony Simpson)
  26. Diary Of A Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (Director: David Bowers)
  27. Dino Time (Directors: Yoon-suk Choi + John Kafka)
  28. Dorothy And The Witches Of Oz (Director: Leigh Scott)
  29. Ekk Deewana Tha (Director: Gautham Menon)
  30. Ernest & Celestine (Directors: Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar + Benjamin Renner)
  31. Fill The Void (Director: Rama Burshtein)
  32. Foodfight! (Director: Lawrence Kasanoff)
  33. Frankenweenie (Director: Tim Burton)
  34. Gladiators Of Rome (Director: Iginio Straffi)
  35. Heart Land (Director: Fred Holmes)
  36. Hercules Saves Christmas (Director: Edward Hightower)
  37. Here Comes The Boom (Director: Frank Coraci)
  38. Hotel Transylvania (Director: Genndy Tartakovsky)
  39. I Heart Shakey (Director: Kevin Cooper)
  40. Ice Age: Continental Drift (Directors: Steve Martino + Mike Thurmeier)
  41. Ivan The Incredible (Director: Michael Hegner)
  42. Jonas (Director: Adam Rehmeier)
  43. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (Director: Brad Peyton)
  44. Last Ounce Of Courage (Directors: Darrel Campbell + Kevin McAfee)
  45. Life Of Pi (Director: Ang Lee)
  46. Little Red Wagon (Director: David Anspaugh)
  47. Madagascar III: Europe’s Most Wanted (Directors: Eric Darnell, Tom McGrath + Conrad Vernon)
  48. Madam Butterfly 3D (Director: Julian Napier)
  49. Mirror Mirror (Director: Tarsem Singh)
  50. Not That Funny (Director: Lauralee Farrer)
  51. Outback (Director: Kyung Ho Lee)
  52. Papa (Director: Ji-Seung Han)
  53. ParaNorman (Directors: Chris Butler + Sam Fell)
  54. Parental Guidance (Director: Andy Fickman)
  55. Primates Of The Caribbean (Marco Macaco) (Director: Jan Rahbek)
  56. Rise Of The Guardians (Director: Peter Ramsey)
  57. Sky Force 3D (Director: Tony Tang)
  58. Smitty (Director: David Mickey Evans)
  59. Snow Queen (Directors: Vladlen Barbe + Maksim Sveshnikov)
  60. Stealing Roses (Director: Megan Clare Johnson)
  61. The Adventures Of Huck Finn (Director: Hermine Huntgeburth)
  62. The Adventures Of Mickey Matson And The Copperhead Treasure (Director: Harold Cronk)
  63. The Robot Giant (Director: Prapas Cholsaranont)
  64. The Illusionauts (Director: Eduardo Schuldt)
  65. The Lorax (Directors: Chris Renaud + Kyle Balda)
  66. The Magic Of Belle Isle (Director: Rob Reiner)
  67. The Odd Life Of Timothy Green (Director: Peter Hedges)
  68. The Pirates! Band Of Misfits (Directors: Peter Lord + Jeff Newitt)
  69. The Reef II: High Tide (Directors: Mark A.Z. Dippé + Taedong Park)
  70. The Swan Princess Christmas (Director: Richard Rich)
  71. The Three Stooges (Directors: Bobby Farrelly + Peter Farrelly)
  72. The Woodcarver (Director: Terry Ingram)
  73. Thunderstruck (Director: John Whitesell)
  74. Unicorn City (Director: Bryan Lefler)
  75. Victor and the Secret of Crocodile Mansion (Directors: Cyrill Boss + Philipp Stennert)
  76. Wadjda (Director: Haifaa Al-Mansour)
  77. We Are Family (Director: Renat Davletyarov)
  78. White Men Can’t Dance (Director: Pete Vinal)
  79. Wolf Children (Director: Mamoru Hosoda)
  80. Wolf Dog (Director: Bernadine Santistevan)
  81. Won’t Back Down (Director: Daniel Barnz)
  82. Wordlessness (Director: Daryush Shokof)
  83. Wreck-It Ralph (Director: Rich Moore)
PG-13
  1. A Beautiful Soul (Director: Jeffrey W. Byrd)
  2. A Measure Of Faith (Director: Dalas Davis)
  3. A Thousand Words (Director: Brian Robbins)
  4. After (Director: Ryan Smith)
  5. Alex Cross (Director: Rob Cohen)
  6. Amour (Director: Michael Haneke)
  7. Angus Buchan’s Ordinary People (Director: F.C. Hamman)
  8. Atlas Shrugged II: The Strike (Director: John Putch)
  9. Barbara (Director: Christian Petzold)
  10. Barricade (Director: Andrew Currie)
  11. Battlefield America (Director: Chris Stokes)
  12. Battleship (Director: Peter Berg)
  13. Beasts Of The Southern Wild (Director: Benh Zeitlin)
  14. Bending The Rules (Director: Artie Mandelberg)
  15. Best Man Down (Director: Ted Koland)
  16. Beyond (Director: Josef Rusnak)
  17. Blue Like Jazz (Director: Steve Taylor)
  18. Chinese Zodiac (Director: Jackie Chan)
  19. Christmas In Compton (Director: David Raynr)
  20. Chronicle (Director: Josh Trank)
  21. Columbus Circle (Director: George Gallo)
  22. Croczilla (Director: Lisheng Lin)
  23. Crooked Arrows (Director: Steve Rash)
  24. Crossroad (Director: Shervin Youssefian)
  25. Dark Shadows (Director: Tim Burton)
  26. Dark Tide (Director: John Stockwell)
  27. Darling Companion (Director: Lawrence Kasdan)
  28. Deadline (Director: Curt Hahn)
  29. Deep In The Heart (Director: Christopher Cain)
  30. Desperate Endeavors (Director: Salim Khassa)
  31. Emperor (Director: Peter Webber)
  32. Firefall: An Epic Family Adventure (Director: Matthew Sconce)
  33. Frequency (Director: Jeff Prince)
  34. Fun Size (Director: Josh Schwartz)
  35. Gambit (Director: Michael Hoffman)
  36. General Education (Director: Tom Morris)
  37. Ginger & Rosa (Director: Sally Potter)
  38. Girl Most Likely (Directors: Shari Springer Berman + Robert Pulcini)
  39. Girl In Progress (Director: Patricia Riggen)
  40. Gone (Director: Heitor Dhalia)
  41. Good Deeds (Director: Tyler Perry)
  42. Great Expectations (Director: Mike Newell)
  43. Greencastle (Director: Koran Dunbar)
  44. Hardflip (Director: Johnny Remo)
  45. Hatfields And McCoys: Bad Blood (Director: Fred Olen Ray)
  46. Hattrick (Director: Robert Ronny)
  47. Haute Cuisine (Director: Christian Vincent)
  48. Hitchcock (Director: Sacha Gervasi)
  49. Hope Springs (Director: David Frankel)
  50. House At The End Of The Street (Director: Mark Tonderai)
  51. Iniquity (Director: Joshua Coates)
  52. Jack Reacher (Director: Christopher McQuarrie)
  53. John Carter (Director: Andrew Stanton)
  54. Joyful Noise (Director: Todd Graff)
  55. Judge Archer (Director: Haofeng Xu)
  56. Kon-Tiki (Directors: Joachim Rønning + Espen Sandberg)
  57. LOL (Director: Lisa Azuelos)
  58. Le Chef (Director: Daniel Cohen)
  59. Les Misérables (Director: Tom Hooper)
  60. Liberal Arts (Director: Josh Radnor)
  61. Lincoln (Director: Steven Spielberg)
  62. Lockout (Director: James Mather + Stephen St. Leger)
  63. London Paris New York (Director: Anu Menon)
  64. Madea’s Witness Protection (Director: Tyler Perry)
  65. Man On A Ledge (Director: Asger Leth)
  66. Margarine Wars (Director: David Rich)
  67. Moonrise Kingdom (Director: Wes Anderson)
  68. Mr. Pip (Director: Andrew Adamson)
  69. Much Ado About Nothing (Director: Joss Whedon)
  70. Mud (Director: Jeff Nichols)
  71. My Uncle Rafael (Director: Marc Fusco)
  72. Nesting (Director: John Chuldenko)
  73. No One Will Know (Director: Raj Rohit Reddy)
  74. Now Is Good (Director: Ol Parker)
  75. One For The Money (Director: Julie Anne Robinson)
  76. People Like Us (Director: Alex Kurtzman)
  77. Pitch Perfect (Director: Jason Moore)
  78. Playing For Keeps (Director: Gabriel Muccino)
  79. Premium Rush (Director: David Koepp)
  80. Quartet (Director: Dustin Hoffman)
  81. Red Dawn (Director: Dan Bradley)
  82. Red Tails (Director: Anthony Hemingway)
  83. Refugee From The Storm (Director: Elias Acosta)
  84. Robot & Frank (Director: Jake Schreier)
  85. Rock Of Ages (Director: Adam Shankman)
  86. Roxy (Director: Larry Giorgio)
  87. Saints And Soldiers: Airborne Creed (Director: Ryan Little)
  88. Shanghai Calling (Director: Daniel Hsia)
  89. Skyfall (Director: Sam Mendes)
  90. Sleepwalk With Me (Directors: Mike Birbiglia + Seth Barrish)
  91. Snow White (Director: Pablo Berger)
  92. Snow White And The Huntsman (Director: Rupert Sanders)
  93. Snow White: A Deadly Summer (Director: David DeCoteau)
  94. So Undercover (Director: Tom Vaughn)
  95. Sol (Director: Ben Carland)
  96. Spare Time Killers (Director: Jay Tando)
  97. Sparkle (Director: Salim Akil)
  98. Step Up: Revolution (Director: Scott Speer)
  99. Still Mine (Director: Michael McGowan)
  100. Swan Lake (Directors: Ross MacGibbon + Matthew Bourne)
  101. Tai Chi Zero (Director: Stephen Fung)
  102. Taken II (Director: Olivier megaton)
  103. The Amazing Spider-Man (Director: Marc Webb)
  104. The Apparition (Director: Todd Lincoln)
  105. The Avengers (Director: Joss Whedon)
  106. The Bourne Legacy (Director: Tony Gilroy)
  107. The Citizen (Director: Sam Kadi)
  108. The Cold Light Of Day (Director: Mabrouk El Mechri)
  109. The Dark Night Rises (Director: Christopher Nolan)
  110. The Dinosaur Project (Director: Sid Bennett)
  111. The First Time (Director: Jon Kasdan)
  112. The Fitzgerald Family Christmas (Director: Edward Burns)
  113. The Forger (Director: Lawrence Roeck)
  114. The Frontier Boys (Director: John Grooters)
  115. The Frozen (Director: Andrew Hyatt)
  116. The Giant Mechanical Man (Director: Lee Kirk)
  117. The Girl (Director: David Riker)
  118. The Guilt Trip (Director: Anne Fletcher)
  119. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (Director: Peter Jackson)
  120. The Impossible (Director: J.A. Bayona)
  121. The Lucky One (Director: Scott Hicks)
  122. The Message (Director: Thomas P. Clay)
  123. The Mine (Director: Jeff Chamberlain)
  124. The Obama Effect (Director: Charles S. Dutton)
  125. The Other Son (Director: Lorraine Lévy)
  126. The Perks Of Being A Wallflower (Director: Stephen Chbosky)
  127. The Possession (Director: Ole Bornedal)
  128. The Sapphires (Director: Wayne Blair)
  129. The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn (Pt. 2) (Director: Bill Condon)
  130. The Vow (Director: Michael Sucsy)
  131. The Woman In Black (Director: James Watkins)
  132. The Words (Directors: Brian Klugman + Lee Sternthal)
  133. The Worm And The Poodle (Director: Amy Thorstenson)
  134. Think Like A Man (Director: Tim Story)
  135. Tiger Eyes (Director: Lawrence Blume)
  136. To Write Love On Her Arms (Director: Nathan Frankowski)
  137. Total Recall (Director: Len Wiseman)
  138. Trade Of Innocents (Director: Christopher M. Bessette)
  139. Transit (Director: Antonio Negret)
  140. Trouble With The Curve (Director: Robert Lorenz)
  141. Unconditional (Director: Brent McCorkle)
  142. Unfinished Song (Director: Paul Andrew Williams)
  143. Unleashing Roy (Director: Jack Stanis)
  144. Unstable (Director: Michael Feifer)
  145. Unwitting Victims (Director: Peter Winter Byington)
  146. Upside Down (Director: Juan Solanas)
  147. Vamps (Director: Amy Heckerling)
  148. War Flowers (Director: Serge Rodnunsky)
  149. War Of The Worlds: Goliath (Director: Joe Pearson)
  150. What To Expect When You’re Expecting (Director: Kirk Jones)
  151. Woman Thou Art Loosed: On the 7th Day (Director: Neema Barnette)
  152. Wrath Of The Titans (Director: Jonathan Liebesman)
R
  1. 100 Ghost Street: The Return Of Richard Speck (Director: Martin Wichmann)
  2. 12/12/12 (Director: Jared Cohn)
  3. 2 Days In New York (Director: Julie Delpy)
  4. 21 Jump Street (Directors: Phil Lord + Christopher Miller)
  5. 30 Beats (Director: Alexis Lloyd)
  6. 6 Bullets (Director: Ernie Barbarash)
  7. 6 Plots (Director: Leigh Sheehan)
  8. 7 Below (Director: Kevin Carraway)
  9. A Dark Truth (Director: Damian Lee)
  10. A Fantastic Fear Of Everything (Directors: Crispian Mills, + Chris Hopewell)
  11. A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III (Director: Roman Coppola)
  12. A Hijacking (Director: Tobias Lindholm)
  13. A Kiss And A Promise (Director: Phillip Guzman)
  14. A Late Quartet (Director: Yaron Zilberman)
  15. A Liar's Autobiography: The Untrue Story of Monty Python's Graham Chapman (Directors: Bill Jones, Jeff Simpson + Ben Timlett)
  16. A Little Bit Zombie (Director: Casey Walker)
  17. A Royal Affair (Director: Nikolaj Arcel)
  18. ATM (Director: David Brooks)
  19. About Cherry (Director: Stephen Elliott)
  20. Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (Director: Timur Bekmambetov)
  21. Act Of Valor (Directors: Mike McCoy + Scott Waugh)
  22. Aftershock (Director: Nicolás López)
  23. Alien Dawn (Director: Neil Johnson)
  24. Alien Uprising (Director: Dominic Burns)
  25. Allegiance (Director: Michael Connors)
  26. Alter Egos (Director: Jordan Galland)
  27. Amber Alert (Director: Kerry Bellessa)
  28. Ambush At Dark Canyon (Director: Dustin Rikert)
  29. American Mary (Director: Jen Soska + Sylvia Soska)
  30. American Reunion (Directors: Jon Hurwitz + Hayden Schlossberg)
  31. Among Friends (Director: Danielle Harris)
  32. And While We Were Here (Director: Kat Coiro)
  33. Android Insurrection (Director: Andrew Bellware)
  34. Anna Karenina (Director: Joe Wright)
  35. Any Day Now (Director: Travis Fine)
  36. Apartment 1303 3D (Director: Michael Taverna)
  37. Arbitrage (Director: Nicholas Jarecki)
  38. Argo (Director: Ben Affleck)
  39. Armynel (Director: Lance Dumais)
  40. Arthur Newman (Director: Dante Ariola)
  41. Assassin’s Bullet (Director: Isaac Florentine)
  42. At Any Price (Director: Ramin Bahrani)
  43. Attack of the 50 Foot Cheerleader (Director: Kevin O’Neill)
  44. August. Eighth (Director: Dzhanik Fayziev)
  45. Axed (Director: Ryan Lee Driscoll)
  46. Bachelorette (Director: Leslye Headland)
  47. Bad Ass (Director: Craig Moss)
  48. Bad Blood (Director: Conrad Janis)
  49. Bad Karma (Director: Suri Krishnamma)
  50. Bad Kids Go To Hell (Director: Matthew Spradlin)
  51. Bait (Director: Kimble Rendall)
  52. Battle Force (Director: Scott Martin)
  53. Barrio Tales (Director: Jarrett Tarnol)
  54. Becoming Redwood (Director: Jesse James Miller)
  55. Being Flynn (Director: Paul Weitz)
  56. Bel Ami (Directors: Declan Donnellan + Nick Ormerod)
  57. Between Us (Director: Dan Mirvish)
  58. Beyond Outrage (Director: Takeshi Kitano)
  59. Beyond The Trophy (Director: Daniel J. Gillin)
  60. Bigfoot County (Director: Stephon Stewart)
  61. Bindlestiffs (Director: Andrew Edison)
  62. Birds Of A Feather (Director: Curtis Franklin)
  63. Black Box (Director: Matthew Schilling)
  64. Black Rock (Director: Katie Aselton)
  65. Black’s Game (Director: Óskar Thór Axelsson)
  66. Blood Money (Director: Gregory McQualter)
  67. Bloodwork (Director: Eric Wostenberg)
  68. Book Of 1000 Deaths (Directors: Andretti Dante + Shavsha Israel)
  69. Border Run (Director: Gabriela Tagliavini)
  70. Born Wild (Director Dustin Rikert)
  71. Brake (Director: Gabe Torres)
  72. Branded (Directors: Jamie Bradshaw + Alexander Dulerayn)
  73. Brawl (Directors: Julaluck Ismalone + David Ismalone)
  74. Breaking Wind (Director: Craig Moss)
  75. Breathless (Director: Jesse Baget)
  76. Bro' (Director: Nick Parada)
  77. Broken Faith (Directors: Ricki Holmes + Danny Rogers)
  78. Bullet To The Head (Director: Walter Hill)
  79. Butcher Boys (Directors: Duane Graves + Justine Meeks)
  80. Byzantium (Director: Neil Jordan)
  81. C’mon Man (Director: Kenny Young)
  82. Capital (Director: Costa-Gavras)
  83. Casa de mi Padre (Director: Matt Piedmont)
  84. Celeste & Jesse Forever (Director: Lee Toland Krieger)
  85. Chained (Director: Jennifer Lynch)
  86. Changing The Game (Director: Rel Dowdell)
  87. Chernobyl Diaries (Director: Bradley Parker)
  88. Children Of Sorrow (Director: Jourdan McClure)
  89. Citadel (Director: Ciarán Foy)
  90. Cloud Atlas (Directors: Tom Tykwer, Lana Wachowski + Lilly Wachowski)
  91. Cold War (Directors: Lok Man Leung + Kim-Ching Luk)
  92. Come Out And Play (Director: Makinov)
  93. Compliance (Director: Craig Zobel)
  94. Contraband (Director: Baltasar Kormákur)
  95. Cosmopolis (Director: David Cronenberg)
  96. Crew 2 Crew (Director: Mark Bacci)
  97. Critical Decisions (Directors: Carl June + Louis Libran)
  98. Crowsnest (Director: Brenton Spencer)
  99. Dark Tourist (Director: Suri Krishnamma)
  100. Dawn Rider (Director: Terry Miles)
  101. Dead Before Dawn 3D (Director: April Mullen)
  102. Deadfall (Director: Stefan Ruzowitzky)
  103. Disconnect (Director: Henry Alex Rubin)
  104. Django Unchained (Director: Quentin Tarantino)
  105. Doc. 33 (Director: Giacomo Gabrielli)
  106. Dragon Eyes (Director: John Hyams)
  107. Dredd (Director: Pete Travis)
  108. Drug War (Director: Johnnie To)
  109. Easy Rider II: The Ride Home (Director: Dustin Rikert)
  110. Eden (Director: Megan Griffiths)
  111. El Gringo (Director: Eduardo Rodriguez)
  112. Electrick Children (Director: Rebecca Thomas)
  113. Elfie Hopkins: Cannibal Hunter (Director: Ryan Andrews)
  114. End Roll (Directors: Giacomo Gabrielli + Daniele Misischia)
  115. End Of Watch (Director: David Ayer)
  116. Erased (Director: Philipp Stölzl)
  117. Everybody Has A Plan (Director: Ana Piterbarg)
  118. Extraction (Director: Nir Paniry)
  119. FDR: American Badass! (Director: Garrett Brawith)
  120. Farewell, My Queen (Director: Benoît Jacquot)
  121. Fat Kid Rules The World (Director: Matthew Lillard)
  122. Filly Brown (Directors: Youssef Delara + Michael D. Olmos)
  123. Fire With Fire (Director: David Barrett)
  124. Flight (Director: Robert Zemeckis)
  125. For Greater Glory: The True Story Of Cristiada (Director: Dean Wright)
  126. For A Good Time, Call... (Director: Jamie Travis)
  127. For The Love Of Money (Director: Ellie Kanner)
  128. Four (Director: Joshua Sanchez)
  129. Frances Ha (Director: Noah Baumbach)
  130. Freaky Deaky (Director: Charles Matthau)
  131. Free Samples (Director: Jay Gammill)
  132. Freelancers (Director: Jessy Terrero)
  133. Freeloaders (Director: Dan Rosen)
  134. Funeral Kings (Directors: Kevin McManus + Matthew McManus)
  135. Gallowwalkers (Director: Andrew Goth)
  136. Generation Um... (Director: Mark Mann)
  137. Get The Gringo (Director: Adrian Grunberg)
  138. Ghost Graduation (Director: Javier Ruiz Caldera)
  139. Girls Against Boys (Director: Austin Chick)
  140. Girls Gone Dead (Directors: Michael Hoffman, Jr. + Aaron T. Wells)
  141. Goats (Director: Christopher Neil)
  142. Grassroots (Director: Stephen Gyllenhaal)
  143. Greystone Park (Director: Sean Stone)
  144. Heathens And Thieves (Director: Megan Peterson + John Douglas Sinclair)
  145. Hellbenders (Director: J.T. Petty)
  146. Hello I Must Be Going (Director: Todd Louiso)
  147. Highway (Director: Coke Daniels)
  148. Hijacked (Director: Brandon Nutt)
  149. Hirokin: The Last Samurai (Director: Alejo Mo-Sun)
  150. Hit And Run (Directors: David Palmer + Dax Shepard)
  151. Hold Your Breath (Director: Jared Cohn)
  152. House Arrest (Director: William Washington)
  153. Hyde Park On Hudson (Director: Roger Michell)
  154. If I Were You (Director: Joan Carr-Wiggin)
  155. In The Hive (Director: Robert Townsend)
  156. In The House (Director: François Ozon)
  157. Inch-Allah (Director: Anaïs Barbeau-Lavalette)
  158. Inescapable (Director: Ruba Nadda)
  159. Infected (Director: Glenn Ciano)
  160. Inhuman Resources (Director: Daniel Krige)
  161. Into The White (Director: Petter Næss)
  162. Iron Sky (Director: Timo Vuorensola)
  163. It’s A Disaster (Director: Todd Berger)
  164. Jack & Diane (Director: Bradley Rust Gray)
  165. Jannat II (Director: Kunal Deshmukh)
  166. Jayne Mansfield’s Car (Director: Billy Bob Thornton)
  167. John Dies At The End (Director: Don Coscarelli)
  168. Just 45 Minutes From Broadway (Director: Henry Jaglom)
  169. Just Like A Woman (Director: Rachid Bouchareb)
  170. Killed Mr. Killer (Director: Ron Sauer)
  171. Killing Them Softly (Director: Andrew Dominik)
  172. Kiss Of The Damned (Director: Xan Cassavetes)
  173. Knife Fight (Director: Bill Guttentag)
  174. Knights Of Malice (Director: Mickey Reece)
  175. LUV (Director: Sheldon Candis)
  176. Lawless (Director: John Hillcoat)
  177. Lay The Favorite (Director: Stephen Frears)
  178. Least Among Saints (Director: Martin Papazian)
  179. Life’s A Beach (Director: Tony Vitale)
  180. Lola Versus (Director: Daryl Wein)
  181. Looper (Director: Rian Johnson)
  182. Lord Of Darkness (Director: Ricky Wood)
  183. Love Is All You Need (Director: Susanne Bier)
  184. Love Sick Love (Director: Christian Charles)
  185. Love Written In Blood (Director: undisclosed)
  186. Mac & Devin Go To High School (Director: Dylan C. Brown)
  187. Mafia (Director: Ryan Combs)
  188. Magic Mike (Director: Steven Soderbergh)
  189. Man From Shaolin (Directors: Peng Zhang Li + R.T. Wong)
  190. Mancation (Director: Frank Vain)
  191. Maximum Conviction (Director: Keoni Waxman)
  192. Meeting Evil (Director: Chris Fisher)
  193. Memorial Day (Director: Samuel Fischer)
  194. Men In Black III (Director: Barry Sonnenfeld)
  195. Middle Of Nowhere (Director: Ava Duvernay)
  196. Mighty Fine (Director: Debbie Goodstein)
  197. Money Fight (Directors: Adam Boster + Kenneth Chamitoff)
  198. Money Shot (Director: Bill McAdams, Jr.)
  199. Motorway (Director: Pou-Soi Cheang)
  200. Nature Calls (Director: Todd Rohal)
  201. Night Of The Living Dead 3D: Re-Animation (Director: Jeff Broadstreet)
  202. Night Of The Living Dead: Resurrection (Director: James Plumb)
  203. Nightmare Fuel (Director: Russel Parks)
  204. No (Director: Pablo Larraín)
  205. No One Lives (Director: Ryûhei Kitamura)
  206. No Vacancy (Director: Chris Stokes)
  207. Nobody Walks (Director: Ry Russo-Young)
  208. Noobz (Director: Blake Freeman)
  209. Not Fade Away (Director: David Chase)
  210. Not Suitable For Children (Director: Peter Templeman)
  211. On The Other Side Of The Tracks (Director: David Charhon)
  212. On The Road (Director: Walter Salles)
  213. One In The Chamber (Director: William Kaufman)
  214. Overnight (Director: Valerie Breiman)
  215. Paranormal Activity IV (Director: Henry Joost + Ariel Schulman)
  216. Parasitic (Director: Tim Martin)
  217. Passion (Director: Brian De Palma)
  218. Paulette (Director: Jérôme Enrico)
  219. Picture Day (Director: Kate Melville)
  220. Piranha 3DD (Director: John Gulager)
  221. Playback (Director: Michael A. Nickles)
  222. Populaire (Director: Régis Roinsard)
  223. Project X (Director: Nima Nourizadeh)
  224. Prometheus (Director: Ridley Scott)
  225. Promised Land (Director: Gus Van Sant)
  226. Pusher (Director: Luis Prieto)
  227. Raaz III: The Third Dimension (Director: Vikram Bhatt)
  228. Reality (Director: Matteo Garrone)
  229. [rec.] III: Genesis (Director: Paco Plaza)
  230. Red Hook Summer (Director: Spike Lee)
  231. Red Lights (Director: Rodrigo Cortés)
  232. Renoir (Director: Gilles Bourdos)
  233. Resident Evil: Damnation (Directors: Makoto Kamiya + Toyoshi Minamino)
  234. Resident Evil: Retribution (Director: Paul W.S. Anderson)
  235. Revenge For Jolly! (Director: Chadd Harbold)
  236. Rites Of Passage (Director: W. Peter Iliff)
  237. Ritual (Director: Joko Anwar)
  238. Robin Hood: Ghosts Of Sherwood (Director: Oliver Krekel)
  239. Rogue River (Director: Jourdan McClure)
  240. Room 13 (Pt. II) (Director: Hunter Goligoski)
  241. Ruby Sparks (Directors: Jonathan Dayton & Valerie Faris)
  242. Rust And Bone (Director: Jacques Audiard)
  243. Safe (Director: Boaz Yakin)
  244. Safe House (Director: Daniel Espinosa)
  245. Safety Not Guaranteed (Director: Colin Trevorrow)
  246. Sassy Pants (Director: Coley Sohn)
  247. Saturday Morning Mystery (Director: Spencer Parsons)
  248. Savages (Director: Oliver Stone)
  249. Save The Date (Director: Michael Mohan)
  250. Scary Or Die (Directors: Bob Badway, Michael Emanuel + Igor Meglic)
  251. Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World (Director: Lorene Scafaria)
  252. Seven Psychopaths (Director: Martin McDonagh)
  253. Shadow Dancer (Director: James Marsh)
  254. Silver Linings Playbook (Director: David O. Russell)
  255. Sin Reaper 3D (Director: Sebastian Bartolitius)
  256. Sinister (Director: Scott Derrickson)
  257. Slumber Party Slaughter (Director: Rebekah Chaney)
  258. Small Apartments (Director: Jonas Åkerlund)
  259. Smashed (Director: James Ponsoldt)
  260. Smiley (Director: Michael J. Gallagher)
  261. Soldiers Of Fortune (Director: Maxim Korostyshevsky)
  262. Sorority Party Massacre (Directors: Chris W. Freeman + Justin Jones)
  263. South Of Sanity (Directors: Mathew Edwards + Kirk Watson)
  264. Spring Breakers (Director: Harmony Korine)
  265. Stand Up Guys (Director: Fisher Stevens)
  266. Starship Troopers: Invasion (Director: Shinji Aramaki)
  267. Stash House (Director: Eduardo Rodriguez)
  268. Stitches (Director: Conor McMahon)
  269. Stolen (Director: Simon West)
  270. Storage 24 (Director: Johannes Roberts)
  271. Stories Of The Paranormal: It Came In The Night (Director: Kelly Weaver)
  272. Strange, Stranger (Director: Daryush Shokof)
  273. Stuck In Love (Director: Josh Boone)
  274. Sushi Girl (Director: Kern Saxton)
  275. Ted (Director: Seth MacFarlane)
  276. Thanks For Sharing (Director: Stuart Blumberg)
  277. That’s My Boy (Director: Sean Anders)
  278. That’s What She Said (Director: Carrie Preston)
  279. The 49th Line (Director: Drew O’Kane)
  280. The Aggression Scale (Director: Steven C. Miller)
  281. The Amazing Adventures Of The Living Corpse (Director: Justin Paul Ritter)
  282. The Artist And The Model (Director: Fernando Trueba)
  283. The Attack (Director: Ziad Doueiri)
  284. The Babymakers (Director: Jay Chandrasekhar)
  285. The Barrens (Director: Darren Lynn Bousman)
  286. The Bay (Director: Barry Levinson)
  287. The Baytown Outlaws (Director: Barry Battles)
  288. The Brass Teapot (Director: Ramaa Mosley)
  289. The Cabin In The Woods (Director: Drew Goddard)
  290. The Campaign (Director: Jay Roach)
  291. The Collection (Director: Marcus Dunstan)
  292. The Color Of Time (Directors: Edna Luise Biesold, Sarah-Violet Bliss, Gabrielle Demeestere, Alexis Gambis, Brooke Goldfinch, Shripriya Mahesh, Pamela Romanowsky, Bruce Thierry Cheung, Tine Thomasen, Virginia Urreiztieta + Omar Zúñiga Hidalgo)
  293. The Company You Keep (Director: Robert Redford)
  294. The Courier (Director: Hany Abu-Assad)
  295. The Darkening (Director: Jack L. Young)
  296. The Day of the Siege: September Eleven 1683 (Director: Renzo Martinelli)
  297. The Devil Inside (Director: William Brent Bell)
  298. The Dictator (Director: Larry Charles)
  299. The Do-Deca-Pentathlon (Directors: Jay Duplass + Mark Duplass)
  300. The Doorway (Director: Chase Smith)
  301. The Expendables (Director: Simon West)
  302. The Factory (Director: Morgan O’Neill)
  303. The Five-Year Engagement (Director: Nicholas Stoller)
  304. The Gangster (Director: Kongkiat Khomsiri)
  305. The Ghostmaker (Director: Mauro Borrelli)
  306. The Girl From The Naked Eye (Director: David Ren)
  307. The Guillotines (Director: Wai-Keung Lau)
  308. The Hunger Games (Director: Gary Ross)
  309. The Hunt (Director: Thomas Vinterberg)
  310. The Iceman (Director: Ariel Vromen)
  311. The King Of Najayo (Director: Fernando Baez Mella)
  312. The Kitchen (Director: Ishai Setton)
  313. The Legend Of Black Annie (Directors: Terrence Flack + Shane Woodson)
  314. The Lesser Blessed (Director: Anita Doron)
  315. The Letter (Director: Jay Anania)
  316. The Liability (Director: Craig Viveiros)
  317. The Lords Of Salem (Director: Rob Zombie)
  318. The Man With The Iron Fists (Director: RZA)
  319. The Master (Director: Paul Thomas Anderson)
  320. The Mooring (Director: Glenn Withrow)
  321. The Motel Life (Directors: Alan Polsky + Gabe Polsky)
  322. The Newest Pledge (Director: Jason Michael Brescia)
  323. The Pact (Director: Nicholas McCarthy)
  324. The Paperboy (Director: Lee Daniels)
  325. The Patience Stone (Director: Atiq Rahimi)
  326. The Philly Kid (Director: Jason Connery)
  327. The Place Beyond The Pines (Director: Derek Cianfrance)
  328. The Players (Directors: Emmanuelle Bercot, Fred Cavayé, Alexandre Courtès, Jean Dujardin, Michel Hazanavicius, Jan Kounen, Eric Lartigau, Gilles Lellouche
  329. The Raven (Director: James McTeigue)
  330. The Reluctant Fundamentalist (Director: Mira Nair)
  331. The Rise & Fall Of A White Collar Hooligan (Director: Paul Tanter)
  332. The Samaritan (Director: David Weaver)
  333. The Sessions (Director: Ben Lewin)
  334. The Sweeney (Director: Nick Love)
  335. The Tall Man (Director: Pascal Laugier)
  336. The Thompsons (Directors: Mitchell Altieri + Phil Flores)
  337. The Watch (Director: Akiva Schaffer)
  338. The Watermen (Director: Matt L. Lockhart)
  339. This Is 40 (Director: Judd Apatow)
  340. This Means War (Director: McG)
  341. Tim and Eric's Billion Dollar Movie (Directors: Tim Heidecker + Eric Wareheim)
  342. To Rome With Love (Director: Woody Allen)
  343. To The Wonder (Director: Terrence Malick)
  344. Twice Born (Director: Sergio Castellitto)
  345. Ultrasonic (Director: Rohit Colin Rao)
  346. Under The Bed (Director: Steven C. Miller)
  347. Underworld: Awakening (Directors: Måns Mårlind + Björn Stein )
  348. Universal Soldier: Day Of Reckoning (Director: John Hyams)
  349. V/H/S (Directors: Matt Bettinelli-Olpin, David Bruckner, Tyler Gillett, Justin Martinez, Glenn McQuaid, Radio Silence, Joe Swanberg, Chad Villella, Ti West + Adam Wingard)
  350. Wanderlust (Director: David Wain)
  351. We The Party (Director: Mario Van Peebles)
  352. What Maisie Knew (Director: Scott McGehee + David Siegel)
  353. Why Stop Now? (Director: Phil Dorling + Ron Nyswaner)
  354. Wish You Were Here (Director: Kieran Darcy-Smith)
  355. You're Nobody 'til Somebody Kills You (Director: Michael A. Pinckney)
  356. Zero Dark Thirty (Director: Kathryn Bigelow)
  357. Zombies vs. Strippers (Director: Alex Nicolaou)
NC-17 (none)
submitted by tombstoneshadows28 to movies [link] [comments]


2017.03.26 22:26 ApollyonZr For Honor Fight Club Presents: Proving Grounds

For Honor Fight Club and For Glory! are proud to announce: Proving Grounds

Proving Grounds is a (PC Only) 2v2 brawl invitational. Only 16 teams were invited and 8 of the teams that qualified through the For Honor Fight Academy 2v2 tournament were chosen alongside another 8 chosen from the For Honor Fight Club (FHFC) Discord to participate in this 1 day event. The tournament begins on April 15 at 1pm EDT and of course it is double elimination. LINK

Who qualified?

quchris / Keehu (Fight Academy Qualifer)
Clutchmeister / Toysus (Fight Academy Qualifer)
king_rendal / timlol23 (Fight Academy Qualifer)
KodyackGaming / Greentron122 (Fight Academy Qualifer)
Alernakin / Lordbread (Fight Academy Qualifer)
Skorbrand / Saber.X (Fight Academy Qualifer)
Peterlooko / SixSamuraiShien (Fight Academy Qualifer)
KeneticNRG / xDoomShadow (Fight Academy Qualifer)
The Full List Can Be Found HERE

Is there a prize?

The tournament will consist of a community raised prize pool LINK in which 1st and 2nd place will receive a cash prize.

Cool, is there anything else i should know?

For more information please click on the links down below.
Twitch LINK
For Honor Fight Club Official Twitter LINK
For Honor Fight Academy Discord LINK
Tournament Page LINK
AD
IMPORTANT EDIT 4/10/17:Date has been changed back to 15th (subject to change)
submitted by ApollyonZr to forhonor [link] [comments]


2017.03.26 22:24 ApollyonZr For Honor Fight Club Presents: Proving Grounds

For Honor Fight Club and For Glory! are proud to announce: Proving Grounds
Proving Grounds is a (PC Only) 2v2 brawl invitational. Only 16 teams were invited and 8 of the teams that qualified through the For Honor Fight Academy 2v2 tournament were chosen alongside another 8 chosen from the For Honor Fight Club (FHFC) Discord to participate in this 1 day event. The tournament begins on April 15 at 1pm EDT and of course it is double elimination. LINK
Who qualified?
quchris / Keehu (Fight Academy Qualifer)
Clutchmeister / Toysus (Fight Academy Qualifer)
king_rendal / timlol23 (Fight Academy Qualifer)
KodyackGaming / Greentron122 (Fight Academy Qualifer)
Alernakin / Lordbread (Fight Academy Qualifer)
Skorbrand / Saber.X (Fight Academy Qualifer)
Peterlooko / SixSamuraiShien (Fight Academy Qualifer)
KeneticNRG / xDoomShadow (Fight Academy Qualifer)
The Full List Can Be Found HERE
Is there a prize?
The tournament will consist of a community raised prize pool LINK in which 1st and 2nd will receive a cash prize.
Cool, is there anything else i should know?
For more information please click on the links down below.
Twitch LINK
For Honor Fight Club Official Twitter LINK
For Honor Fight Academy Discord LINK
Tournament Page LINK
AD
IMPORTANT EDIT 4/10/17: Date has been changed back to 15
submitted by ApollyonZr to CompetitiveForHonor [link] [comments]


2016.05.21 09:26 pocketlint60 The Lands of Dark Souls, Part 1.

WARNING: BE WARY OF WALL OF TEXT AHEAD. This is a repost of a post I made a few days ago with some updated information and formatting.
One of my favorite elements of Dark Souls lore is the vast array of countries you hear about. I always got the sense that a more archetypal RPG universe existed outside the weirdness that the game does show. I was really excited to learn about the various countries and what happened since we last heard from them. I wasn't a big fan of Dark Souls 2, but I was a big fan of the new lands like Mirrah, Jugo, and especially Olaphis. I was really happy with Dark Souls 3 bringing back the old ones and keeping the new ones, but this element of the lore has confused a lot of people. How come places like Vinheim were long forgotten in Drangleic but remembered the same way in Lothric as they were in Lordran? Why are Mirrah and Forossa referenced directly while the word "Drangleic" never appears in any item descriptions? So I decided to go country by country and try to give a sort of status report. Then it really hit me how fucking many mentioned countries there are, so I decided to split it up by game, starting with countries from the original. So without further ado, let's start with the shortest: Zena.
Zena: Out of Left Field (Guest Starring Lanafir)
Zena is weird. In fact, it's kind of their gimmick. Zena is described as an isolated and ancient land, and people from there are very odd. You only ever meet one Zenan (Zenian? Zenite? Zenon?), Domnhall. Domnhall's accent and mannerisms resemble Wales, but beyond that you don't learn a thing about the place itself other than it's name. All I can really say about it is that it's similar to Lanafir in Dark Souls 2, home of another quirky merchant named Magerold. Lanafir barely has any more lore surrounding it; a famous archer named Blue-Eyed Durgo is from there. Durgo is notable for being one of the few Lanafirians (Lanafiri? Lanafirans? Lanafirese?) that are famous outside of their homeland, because they're as isolated as Zena. If anyone noticed anything in Dark Souls 3 related to either of these countries, or perhaps a more concrete link between the two, I'd love to hear it.
Astora: Deep Trouble
There's not much to say about Astora that Dark Souls 3 didn't say already. To make a long story short, the once proud land of stalwart, faithful knights is explicitly in ruins. Hell, you learn this before the game even starts, from the description of the Astora Noble face preset.
The features of a true blue blood. Blue of eye and fair of hair, a little reminder of Astora's former glory.
So yeah, the homeland of four of the most popular characters in the series and one of the most iconic armor sets is completely fucked. That's Dark Souls for ya. The only speculation to have is what actually did them in. Well, we only ever hear about one major threat to Astora: The Evil Eye, which is trapped in the Ring of the Evil Eye. It's description says this:
This ring captured the foul spirit of an evil eye, a creature that ravaged Astora. Absorb HP from each defeated foe. The horrid spirit nearly destroyed Astora, but was eventually defeated by "the sword of one most noble."
So no, it wasn't the Evil Eye itself, but what is the evil eye? The ring itself depicts a black sphere with a white oval inside, a monochrome Sauron-esque eyeball. Definitely similar to humanity and a few other Abyss related spells and whatnot. Astora was also a land of faithful knights, and it's likely many holy sites were there. If the Abyss had any influence on or butted heads with Astora, it's possible some of these holy places could've become corrupted. Sound familiar?
The deep was originally a peaceful and sacred place, but became the final rest for many abhorrent things. This tale of the Deep offers protection for those who worship amidst those horrors.
That's the description of Deep Protection. We never do find out where The Deep is, just that it was holy once before being corrupted by Dark. We also know that the Cathedral of the Deep deifies Aldrich...who is also the target of Anri of Astora. The nature of his/her hate of Aldrich specifically among the Lords of Cinder isn't delved into, but it's heavily implied that Anri was saved from Aldrich by Horace the Hushed. Horace's armor has a description that ends in this line:
Horace is one of only two children to escape Aldrich's clutches.
Anri also says that she has to complete her duty as an Unkindled "For the children [they] knew". It sounds like a lot of people were killed by Aldrich...possibly even an entire nation's worth.
Vinheim: Back for the Finale
First of all, let's get this out of the way. Blah blah, yes, flow of time is convoluted. There, I said it. Really though, lots of things we consider basic elements of physics and reality don't apply in Dark Souls, or apply differently. Things like time, space, and game balance. (Heeheehee. Just kidding From.) A great example is with Vinheim. In Dark Souls 1, Vinheim is described as the home of the Dragon School, capital of the world of sorcery. The Lingering Dragoncrest Ring says:
A special ring granted to only the most accomplished sorcerers at Vinheim Dragon School.
In Dark Souls 2, however, it says this:
A ring used long, long ago in a land that existed where Drangleic is now. Extends the length of spell effects. The ancient dragons were once worshipped in several nations, and rumors concerning objects of similar enchantments to this uncommon ring abound in many lands, though their origins are no longer verifiable.
Dark Souls 2 has a running theme of the past being forgotten, and this specific item description sparked a rumor that Drangleic was Vinheim in the future. In Dark Souls 3, however, not only is Vinheim back with it's original name, it is never, at any time, described as having disappeared or anything like that. It's just, you know, Vinheim. Home of sorcery. So what happened? Here I regretfully invoke the "flow of time is convoluted" spiel you've all heard a million times. Lothric is described as where the lands of the Lords of Cinder converge, and it's certainly possible that that applies to time as well as place. In Dark Souls 3, Vinheim was always came back. It just now never went away. Confusing? Yeah, but it's the best I got there.
As for the actual state of things, Vinheim sounds pretty much the same in Ds3 as it did in Ds1.
The Dragon School held effective sovereignty over Vinheim, with a great many adept assassins at its disposal.
Vinheim is effectively ruled by the Dragon School, and the "actual" government is more of a facade. The biggest difference is that, according to the Old Sorcerer set (That is, the sorcerer outfit from Ds1), the unofficial practice of sending sorcerers on journeys became an official part of the curriculum at the school at some point between 1 and 3.
Carim and Thorolund: The Holy Land
Despite Carim being one of the most commonly name-dropped locations in the series, I've lumped it together with Thorolund. There's a very good reason though, mostly because they might have more in common than they don't.
In Dark Souls 1, Carim is the land of backstabbers, villains, creepy pardoners, and blue hair (No seriously, in Ds1 the dark blue hair preset says "common in Carim"). The land itself isn't described in much detail, but it definitely has an unpleasant and notorious past. Most items associated with Carim have disturbing origin stories, the Cursebite Ring for instance, which says:
One of the infamous bite rings commissioned by Sir Arstor of Carim. Despite the dreadful rumors surrounding its creation, this ring is an unmistakable asset, in its ability to help prevent curses.
Bad shit was going down to be sure. More specifically, the worst examples of the divinity are tied to Carim. Three goddesses are associated with Carim: Velka, Fina, and Caitha. Lautrec is arguably the most famous Carimite (despite Oswald having the best laugh), and his armor returns for Dark Souls 3. The chest piece answers a question about Lautrec that fans debated for years:
Armor of the pitiable Embraced Knight. Depicts the affection of goddess Fina. The face is crafted to depict the goddess's embrace, quite ignoring the fact that her love is in fact as fickle as the weather.
Fans long speculated that Lautrec did everything he did in Ds1 for Fina, and they were right! Unfortunately for him, she was kind of a bitch. Aw.
Caitha isn't much better. According to the description of her chime in Dark Souls 2...
Cannot be used to cast miracles. Caitha, the goddess of tears, is known as a compassionate being that is with us in times of tragedy, but some believe that she is a demoness that guides us toward misfortune.
In Dark Souls 2 and 3, Caitha's Chime is the best chime for Dark Miracles. Speaking of Dark Miracles, Velka has some too, specifically Vow of Silence and Karmic Justice...both miracles used by the pardoners. (Side note: Anyone else hoping that Karmic Justice makes a return in the DLC? It'd be the perfect counter to Dark Sword R1 spam!) So to reiterate, Carim is a sort of dark (literally and metaphorically) counterpart to Thorolund: they're both the land of clerics and knights in service of the divine, but Carim's pantheon seems much more sinister than that of the Way of White.
Which brings us to Thorolund. Thorolund is Clericville in Ds1, home of the Way of White, the religion focused on sacrificing undead on bonfires so their humanities can burn and prolong the Age of Fire. Ok, maybe they aren't that much better than Carim after all. In fact, Dark Souls 3 basically treats Carim and Thorolund as the same place. Here is a picture of Reah, a maiden from Thorolund in Dark Souls 1. Here is a picture of Irina, a maiden from Carim. On top of that, the Braille Divine Tome of Carim gives you the spell Replenishment, which Reah would give you in Dark Souls 1 as a gift. The strangest thing of all is that there are absolutely no hints as to what happened here; no item descriptions or characters ever say "The southernmost part of Carim used to go by a different name" or anything like that. But are there really no mentions of it at all? How about we look at the Cursebite Ring again, but in Dark Souls 3 this time?
The crafting of these rings is forbidden, perhaps owing to a fear of malleable stone. Clerics, however, dabble freely in the art.
Clerics dabble freely in the art? That's odd, considering that the origin of these rings were "infamous". The Way of White was heavily implied to be the main religion in the Dark Souls universe, so it's not too much of a stretch to say that the descriptions reflect that. So the idea that they would be morally ambiguous in the past, but completely forbidden except by the clergy at the same time that Carim begins to take on characteristics of Thorolund, which isn't even mentioned, is quite a coincidence. I believe That Thorolund was conquered and integrated into Carim. Some traditions from the old Way of White live on in Carim, but they've clearly twisted the church to fall in line more with their own.
So in summary: Carim, land of shady religion, took over Thorolund, land of...less shady religion, and made their religion more shady.
The Great Swamp: Time Moves Forward
The Great Swamp, land of outcasts, has been relatively unchanged by comparison. Because it's a place that welcomes those unwelcome in society, it's also been the home of Pyromancy, a form of magic considered archaic and dated. This hasn't changed very much in Dark Souls 3, and the only hint that it's changed at all is vaguely implied in a set of armor: The Conjurator Set. The Conjurator Set was called the Tattered Cloth Set in the original game. In Ds1, the Tattered Cloth Robe was described as:
Robe worn by pyromancers of the Great Swamp. Though it appears tattered, it is actually quite strong. Their attire offers substantial protection against poison, fire, and other forces of nature out in the hinterlands where they were driven.
The Tattered Cloth Set is in fact the starting set for the Pyromancer in Ds1, which makes it's very different description in Ds3 rather suspicious:
Attire of traveling conjurators. Conjurators were the predecessors to pyromancers, and spent their lives roaming the lands. No wonder their attire was designed to protect them from fire, poison, and other threats of nature.
It seems that pyromancers of today (Ds3 that is) consider the pyromancers of old to not be pyromancers at all, or perhaps a different sect. A bit ironic actually how much of a divide there is between the old and the new, considering that sticking to the old in the face of the new was what pyromancy was about to begin with.
Catarina: Taking it in Stride
Dark Souls is generally a very grim series. I mean, the word dark is right in the title. It's not without humor though. Take Catarina, for instance. Catarina is basically a huge series-long punchline and I love it. Even in-universe it's described as the land of festivity and drink, and it seems completely unaffected by everything. In Dark Souls 1, Siegmeyer, Knight of Catarina, has a daughter named Sieglinde. Sieglinde may be the only character in the game who isn't undead at all. Her father is, though he doesn't seem to mind. If anything he seems happy; he always loved adventure. Now he doesn't have to worry about dying! Catarina in general reflects this attitude and is one of the only places not to be described as ravaged by the curse of the Undead. Sure enough, they are the only country from Dark Souls 1 that gets referred to by it's name in Dark Souls 2. The Old Gods of Lordran are forgotten, Vinheim's legacy has outlived it's place in history, and all the countries I've discussed here are unknown by the people of Drangleic. Catarina though, seems to be doing just fine. You can even get the iconic set again, and it's description says this:
The old tales speak of brave Catarina knights wearing this armor as they rushed courageously into battle.
So even if Catarina is long gone, it's still remembered. It probably isn't long gone though, considering there's a new Onionbro in Dark Souls 3. Just like Vinheim, nothing even vaguely hints that it was ever gone either. So why is Catarina the only country that's so well off? Well I have a theory: Onion Knights are cool. Thing is, I love writing big walls of text discussing and speculating every last description of every last consumable as much as the next guy, but there's a certain point where I have to say, "Ok, I'm probably reading into this too much." Dark Souls has a history of writing meta context into it's world building, and I think Catarina is a sort of playful jab at the Tinfoil Hat types like me. Why is Catarina unaffected by the curse? Because Catarina is super cool! The whole country is basically a joke, and the joke is that they're awesome, so fuck you, they're never going down.
Balder and Berenike: Gone and Long Forgotten
So with that said, let's finish with a brief segment about Balder and Berenike. Balder was the home of Knight King Rendal, and Berenike was the home of Black Iron Tarkus. Items related to both of these characters appear in 3, but neither mention these countries by name. In fact, Dark Souls 3 treats Balder and Berenike the same way Dark Souls 2 treated pretty much every country from the original. The Ring of Steel Protection, a relic of Rendal, describes him very similarly to the other kings of ages past from the Crown Trilogy:
Ring of the Knight King of ancient legend. Increases physical damage absorption. The Knight King was said to be lined with steel on the inside, such that even the talons of mighty dragons did him little harm.
Similarly, The Black Iron Set doesn't mention it's original owner at all:
Armor made of black iron, from the set of armor for which Knightslayer Tsorig was infamously known. Offers extensive and particularly effective protection from fire.
Knightslayer Tsorig must've been pretty notorious to basically erase Tarkus' legacy, and the last memory of Berenike with it. No way he killed Tarkus himself though. He can't even kill a Black Knight!
Phwew. THAT turned out longer than expected. You might have noticed that I haven't said a thing about Oolacile or New Londo, but that's because I'm saving that for Part 3. We'll have to get through the lands surrounding Drangleic before we get to Lothric though, so stay tuned!
EDIT: Here is part two!
EDIT: And here is part three!
submitted by pocketlint60 to darksouls3 [link] [comments]


2016.05.19 05:51 pocketlint60 Lore: Dark Souls State of Address, Part 1: Lands of Dark Souls 1.

WARNING: BE WARY OF WALL OF TEXT AHEAD.
One of my favorite elements of Dark Souls lore is the vast array of countries you hear about. I always got the sense that a more cliche RPG universe existed outside the creativity that the game does show. I was really excited to learn about the various countries and what happened since we last heard from them. I wasn't a big fan of Dark Souls 2, but I was a big fan of the new lands like Mirrah, Jugo, and especially Olaphis. I was really happy with Dark Souls 3 bringing back the old ones and keeping the new ones, but this element of the lore has confused a lot of people. How come places like Vinheim were long forgotten in Drangleic but remembered the same way in Lothric as they were in Lordran? So I decided to go country by country and try to give a sort of status report. Then it really hit me how fucking many mentioned countries there are, so I decided to split it up by game, starting with countries from the original. So without further ado, let's start with the shortest: Zena.
Zena: Out of Left Field (Guest Starring Lanafir)
Zena is weird. In fact, it's kind of their gimmick. Zena is described as an isolated and ancient land, and people from there are very odd. You only ever meet one Zenan (Zenian? Zenite? Zenon?), Domnhall. Domnhall's accent and mannerisms resemble Wales, but beyond that you don't learn a thing about the place itself other than it's name. All I can really say about it is that it's similar to Lanafir in Dark Souls 2, home of another quirky merchant named Magerold. Lanafir barely has any more lore surrounding it; a famous archer named Blue-Eyed Durgo is from there. Durgo is notable for being one of the few Lanafirians (Lanafiri? Lanafirans? Lanafirese?), because they're as isolated as Zena. If anyone noticed anything in Dark Souls 3 related to either of these countries, or perhaps a more concrete link between the two, I'd love to hear it.
Astora: Deep Trouble
There's not much to say about Astora that Dark Souls 3 didn't say already. To make a long story short, the once proud land of stalwart, faithful knights is explicitly in ruins. Hell, you learn this before the game even starts, from the description of the Astora Noble face preset.
The features of a true blue blood. Blue of eye and fair of hair, a little reminder of Astora's former glory.
So yeah, the homeland of four of the most popular characters in the series and one of the most iconic armor sets is completely fucked. That's Dark Souls for ya. The only speculation to have is what actually did them in. Well, we only ever hear about one major threat to Astora: The Evil Eye, which is trapped in the Ring of the Evil Eye. It's description says this:
This ring captured the foul spirit of an evil eye, a creature that ravaged Astora. Absorb HP from each defeated foe. The horrid spirit nearly destroyed Astora, but was eventually defeated by "the sword of one most noble."
So no, it wasn't the Evil Eye itself, but what is the evil eye? The ring itself depicts a black sphere with a white oval inside, a monochrome Sauron-esque eyeball. Definitely similar to humanity and a few other Abyss related spells and whatnot. Astora was also a land of faithful knights, and it's likely many holy sites were there. If the Abyss had any influence on or butted heads with Astora, it's possible some of these holy places could've become corrupted. Sound familiar?
The deep was originally a peaceful and sacred place, but became the final rest for many abhorrent things. This tale of the Deep offers protection for those who worship amidst those horrors.
That's the description of Deep Protection. We never do find out where The Deep is, just that it was holy once before being corrupted by Dark. We also know that the Cathedral of the Deep deifies Aldrich...who is also the target of Anri of Astora. The nature of his/her hate of Aldrich specifically among the Lords of Cinder isn't delved into, but it's heavily implied that Anri was saved from Aldrich by Horace the Hushed. Horace's armor has a description that ends in this line:
Horace is one of only two children to escape Aldrich's clutches.
How many people didn't escape his clutches then? The entire population of Astora perhaps? The Deep is definitely something that needs a little more explaining, and the DLC would be a perfect place for it. I can't help but wonder if they'll connect it to Astora even more.
Vinheim: Back for the Finale
First of all, let's get this out of the way. Blah blah, yes, flow of time is convoluted. There, I said it. Really though, lots of things we consider basic elements of physics and reality don't apply in Dark Souls, or apply differently. Things like time, space, and game balance. (Heeheehee. Just kidding From.) A great example is with Vinheim. In Dark Souls 1, Vinheim is described as the home of the Dragon School, capital of the world of sorcery. The Lingering Dragoncrest Ring says:
A special ring granted to only the most accomplished sorcerers at Vinheim Dragon School.
In Dark Souls 2, however, it says this:
A ring used long, long ago in a land that existed where Drangleic is now. Extends the length of spell effects. The ancient dragons were once worshipped in several nations, and rumors concerning objects of similar enchantments to this uncommon ring abound in many lands, though their origins are no longer verifiable.
Dark Souls 2 has a running theme of the past being forgotten, and this specific item description sparked a rumor that Drangleic was Vinheim in the future. In Dark Souls 3, however, not only is Vinheim back with it's original name, it is never, at any time, described as having disappeared or anything like that. It's just, you know, Vinheim. Home of sorcery. So what happened? Here I regretfully invoke the "flow of time is convoluted" spiel you've all heard a million times. Lothric is described as where the lands of the Lords of Cinder converge, and it's certainly possible that that applies to time as well as place. In Dark Souls 3, Vinheim was always came back. It just now never went away. Confusing? Yeah, but it's the best I got there.
As for the actual state of things, Vinheim sounds pretty much the same in Ds3 as it did in Ds1.
The Dragon School held effective sovereignty over Vinheim, with a great many adept assassins at its disposal.
Vinheim is effectively ruled by the Dragon School, and the "actual" government is more of a facade. The biggest difference is that, according to the Old Sorcerer set (That is, the sorcerer outfit from Ds1), the unofficial practice of sending sorcerers on journeys became an official part of the curriculum at the school at some point between 1 and 3.
Carim and Thorolund: The Holy Land
Despite Carim being one of the most commonly name-dropped locations in the series, I've lumped it together with Thorolund. There's a very good reason though, mostly because they might have more in common than they don't.
In Dark Souls 1, Carim is the land of backstabbers, villains, creepy pardoners, and blue hair (No seriously, in Ds1 the dark blue hair preset says "common in Carim"). The land itself isn't described in much detail, but it definitely has an unpleasant and notorious past. Most items associated with Carim have disturbing origin stories, the Cursebite Ring for instance, which says:
One of the infamous bite rings commissioned by Sir Arstor of Carim. Despite the dreadful rumors surrounding its creation, this ring is an unmistakable asset, in its ability to help prevent curses.
Bad shit was going down to be sure. More specifically, the worst examples of the divinity are tied to Carim. Three goddesses are associated with Carim: Velka, Fina, and Caitha. Lautrec is arguably the most famous Carimite (despite Oswald having the best laugh), and his armor returns for Dark Souls 3. The chest piece answers a question about Lautrec that fans debated for years:
Armor of the pitiable Embraced Knight. Depicts the affection of goddess Fina. The face is crafted to depict the goddess's embrace, quite ignoring the fact that her love is in fact as fickle as the weather.
Fans long speculated that Lautrec was serving Fina, and they were right! Unfortunately for him, she was kind of a bitch. Aw.
Caitha isn't much better. According to Dark Souls 2...
Cannot be used to cast miracles. Caitha, the goddess of tears, is known as a compassionate being that is with us in times of tragedy, but some believe that she is a demoness that guides us toward misfortune.
In Dark Souls 2 and 3, Caitha's Chime is the best chime for Dark Miracles. Speaking of Dark Miracles, Velka has some too, specifically Vow of Silence and Karmic Justice...both miracles used by the pardoners. (Side note: Anyone else hoping that Karmic Justice makes a return in the DLC? It'd be the perfect counter to Dark Sword R1 spam!) So to reiterate, Carim is a sort of dark (literally and metaphorically) counterpart to Thorolund: they're both the land of knights in service of the divine, but Carim's pantheon seems much more sinister than that of the Way of White.
Which brings us to Thorolund. Thorolund is Clericville in Ds1, home of the Way of White, the religion focused on sacrificing undead on bonfires so their humanities can burn and prolong the Age of Fire. Ok, maybe they aren't that much better than Carim after all. In fact, Dark Souls 3 basically treats Carim and Thorolund as the same place. Here is a picture of Reah, a maiden from Thorolund in Dark Souls 1. Here is a picture of Irina, a maiden from Carim. On top of that, the Braille Divine Tome of Carim gives you the spell Replenishment, which Reah would give you in Dark Souls 1 as a gift. The strangest thing of all is that there are absolutely no hints as to what happened here; no item descriptions or characters ever say "The southernmost part of Carim used to go by a different name" or anything like that. But are there really no mentions of it at all? How about we look at the Cursebite Ring again, but in Dark Souls 3 this time?
The crafting of these rings is forbidden, perhaps owing to a fear of malleable stone. Clerics, however, dabble freely in the art.
Clerics dabble freely in the art? That's odd, considering that the origin of these rings were "infamous". The Way of White was heavily implied to be the main religion in the Dark Souls universe, so it's not too much of a stretch to say that the descriptions reflect that. So the idea that they would be morally ambiguous in the past, but completely forbidden except by the clergy at the same time that Carim begins to take on characteristics of Thorolund, which isn't even mentioned, is quite a coincidence. I believe That Thorolund was conquered and integrated into Carim. Some traditions from the old Way of White live on in Carim, but they've clearly twisted the church to their own means.
So in summary: Carim, land of shady religion, took over Thorolund, land of...less shady religion, and made their religion more shady.
The Great Swamp: Time Moves Forward
The Great Swamp, land of outcasts, has been relatively unchanged by comparison. Because it's a place that welcomes those unwelcome in society, it's also become the home of Pyromancy, a form of magic considered archaic and dated. This hasn't changed a bit in Dark Souls 3, and the only hint that it's changed at all is vaguely implied in a set of armor: The Conjurator Set. The Conjurator Set was called the Tattered Cloth Set in the original game, and a new set has taken it's name. In Ds1, the Tattered Cloth Robe was described as:
Robe worn by pyromancers of the Great Swamp. Though it appears tattered, it is actually quite strong. Their attire offers substantial protection against poison, fire, and other forces of nature out in the hinterlands where they were driven.
The Tattered Cloth Set is in fact the starting set for the Pyromancer in Ds1, which makes it's very different description in Ds3 rather suspicious:
Attire of traveling conjurators. Conjurators were the predecessors to pyromancers, and spent their lives roaming the lands. No wonder their attire was designed to protect them from fire, poison, and other threats of nature.
It seems that pyromancers of today (Ds3 that is) consider the pyromancers of old to not be pyromancers at all, or perhaps a different sect. A bit ironic actually how much of a divide there is between the old and the new, considering that sticking to the old in the face of the new was what pyromancy was about to begin with.
Catarina: Taking it in Stride
Dark Souls is generally a very grim series. I mean, the word dark is right in the title. It's definitely not without humor though. Take Catarina, for instance. Catarina is basically a huge series-long punchline and I love it. Even in-universe it's described as the land of festivity and drink, and it seems completely unaffected by everything. In Dark Souls 1, Siegmeyer, Knight of Catarina, has a daughter named Sieglinde. Sieglinde may be the only character in the game who isn't undead at all. Her father is, though he doesn't seem to mind. If anything he seems happy; he always loved adventure. Now he doesn't have to worry about dying! Catarina in general reflects this attitude and is one of the only places not to be described as ravaged by the curse of the Undead. Sure enough, they are the only country from Dark Souls 1 that gets referred to by it's name in Dark Souls 2. The Old Gods of Lordran are forgotten, Vinheim's legacy has outlived it's place in history, and all the countries I've discussed here are unknown by the people of Drangleic. Catarina though, seems to be doing just fine. You can even get the icon set again, and it's description says this:
The old tales speak of brave Catarina knights wearing this armor as they rushed courageously into battle.
So even if Catarina is long gone, it's still remembered. It probably isn't long gone though, considering there's a new Onionbro in Dark Souls 3. Just like Vinheim, nothing even vaguely hints that it was ever gone either. So why is Catarina the only country that's so well off? Well I have a theory: Onion Knights are cool. Thing is, I love writing big walls of text discussing and speculating every last description of every last consumable as much as the next guy, but there's a certain point where I have to say, "Ok, I'm probably reading into this too much." Dark Souls has a history of writing meta context into it's world building, and I think Catarina is a sort of playful jab at the Tinfoil Hat types like me. Why is Catarina unaffected by the curse? Because Catarina is super cool! The whole country is basically a joke, and the joke is that they're awesome, so fuck you, they're never going down.
Balder and Berenike: Gone and Long Forgotten
So with that said, let's finish with a brief segment about Balder and Berenike. Balder was the home of Knight King Rendal, and Berenike was the home of Black Iron Tarkus. Items related to both of these characters appear in 3, but neither mention these countries by name. In fact, Dark Souls 3 treats Balder and Berenike the same way Dark Souls 2 treated pretty much every country from the original. The Ring of Steel Protection, a relic of Rendal, describes him very similarly to the other kings of ages past from the Crown Trilogy:
Ring of the Knight King of ancient legend. Increases physical damage absorption. The Knight King was said to be lined with steel on the inside, such that even the talons of mighty dragons did him little harm.
Similarly, The Black Iron Set doesn't mention it's original owner at all:
Armor made of black iron, from the set of armor for which Knightslayer Tsorig was infamously known. Offers extensive and particularly effective protection from fire.
Knightslayer Tsorig must've been pretty notorious to basically erase Tarkus' legacy, and the last memory of Berenike with it. No way he killed Tarkus himself though. He can't even kill a Black Knight!
Phwew. THAT turned out longer than expected. You might have noticed that I haven't said a thing about Oolacile or New Londo, but that's because I'm saving that for Part 3. We'll have to get through the lands surrounding Drangleic before we get to Lothric though, so stay tuned! EDIT: Click HERE for part 2 and HERE for part 3!
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2014.04.19 20:50 noirargent [FIGHT THREAD] Scott Quigg vs Tshifhiwa Munyai, Anthony Crolla vs John Murray, Josh Warrington vs Rendall Munroe + more

DATE: Saturday April 19, 2014
LOCATION: Phones 4u Arena, Manchester, Lancashire, UK
TELEVISION: Sky (UK) AWE (US)
TIME: 11:30 AM PST, 2:30 PM EST, 7:30 PM BST

SCOTT QUIGG VS TSHIFHIWA MUNYAI

12 rounds

WBA world super bantamweight title

Scott Quigg vs Tshifhiwa Munyai
27(20)-0-2 RECORD 24(12)-2-1
25 AGE 28
121.5 lbs WEIGHT 121.75 lbs
5'8" HEIGHT 5'9"
? REACH ?
orthodox STANCE orthodox
Bury, Lancashire HOMETOWN Makwarela, South Africa
3(3)-0-2 LAST 5 4(2)-1

JOHN MURRAY VS ANTHONY CROLLA

12 rounds

lightweight division

John Murray vs Anthony Crolla
33(20)-2 RECORD 27(10)-4-1
29 AGE 27
134.75 lbs WEIGHT 135.25 lbs
5'8" HEIGHT 5'8 1/2"
70" REACH 67"
orthodox STANCE orthodox
Manchester, Lancashire HOMETOWN Manchester, Lancashire
3(2)-2 LAST 5 4(1)-0-1

JOSH WARRINGTON VS RENDALL MUNROE

12 rounds

featherweight division

Josh Warrington vs Rendall Munroe
16(1)-0 RECORD 28(11)-4-1
23 AGE 33
125.5 lbs WEIGHT 125 lbs

CALLUM SMITH VS FRANCOIS BASTIENT

6 rounds

light heavyweight division (sort of)

Callum Smith vs Francois Bastient
9(7)-0 RECORD 43(18)-10-1
23 AGE 32
171.25 lbs WEIGHT 177 lbs
Online Stream
FirstRow
FirstRow for UK
Live Coverage

(round by round only for main events due to nba playoffs.)

  • Callum Smith wins by 3rd round stoppage after Bastient's corner throws the towel in. Smith unleashed some brutal combinations and hurt his man to the body. Good win for the prospect.
  • Wow, the formerly feather fisted Josh Warrington scores his second straight stoppage! Munroe quits on the stool!
Live round-by-round coverage
Scott Quigg vs Tshifhiwa Munyai
Round 1
Munyai with a slight height advantage. They come to the center, Munyai misses an attempt to jab the body. Quigg putting pressure and has a straight right blocked. Quigg with a jab to the body, Munyai tries one and avoids a right hand counter. Quigg misses a left hook. Munyai jabs the body, blocked, lands a straight right over the top. Quigg takes it well. Munyai with a slapping right hand. Quigg eats a jab. Munyai trying to fight out of the Mayweather philly shell. Quigg sneaks a tight left over Munyai's glove. Quigg looking for an opening, some way to land something consistently. Munyai on the ropes, Quigg might have landed a little right, but Munyai eats a big left and down he goes!!!!!!!!! Munyai up at 6, he's shaky but ready to go. Quigg comes in, Munyai on his horse. Big right gets in for Quigg. Munyai is shaky. On the ropes. He's trying to hold on and the round comes to a close. Beautiful shot that he never saw coming.

Quigg 10-8

Round 2
A big problem a lot of guys who try to use this Philly shell face is how they're going to defend from a left hook when they come inside. Munyai leaned forward and tried to come back, dropped his right hand and Quigg landed that beautiful left. Quigg with a heavy right and left to the body that gets blocked. Quigg trying the left again, but Munyai had his glove up that time. Munyai jabs the body, reaching though. If he's not recovered yet, reaching is the last thing he needs to do. Munyai with a double left, up then downstairs. The downstairs one was very nice. Munyai digs another left to the body. And another. Quigg wants to get inside and work. Munyai real stiff. Huge 1-2 from Quigg and Munyai freezes momentarily and topples over!!!!!! Munyai up at 8 and here comes Quigg. He misses a home run right, Quigg unloads as Munyai falls into the ropes and the referee jumps in! This fight is over!!!! Fantastic power displayed by Quigg!
Official ruling: Scotty Quigg by TKO2
submitted by noirargent to Boxing [link] [comments]


2014.02.01 21:50 noirargent [FIGHT THREAD] Lee Selby vs Rendall Munroe, Gavin Rees vs Gary Buckland, Anthony Joshua vs Dorian Darch

DATE: Saturday February 1, 2014
LOCATION: Motorpoint Arena, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
TELEVISION: Sky (UK)
TIME: 9:45 PM EST, 6:45 PM PST, 2:45 AM GMT

LEE SELBY VS RENDALL MUNROE

12 rounds

vacant EBU featherweight title

BBBofC British featherweight title

Lee Selby vs Rendall Munroe
17(6)-1 RECORD 27(11)-3-1
26 AGE 33
125.5 lbs WEIGHT 124.25

GAVIN REES VS GARY BUCKLAND

12 rounds

lightweight division

Gavin Rees vs Gary Buckland
37(18)-3-1 RECORD 27(9)-3
33 AGE 27
135 lbs WEIGHT 134.75 LBS

ANTHONY JOSHUA VS DORIAN DARCH

6 rounds

heavyweight division

Anthony Joshua vs Dorian Darch
3(3)-0 RECORD 7(1)-2
24 AGE 29
241.5 lbs WEIGHT 241 lbs
Online Stream
BoxingGuru
FirstRow
FirstRow for UK
I'm only going to be scoring

Gavin Rees vs Gary Buckland

Fighter 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Total
Rees 10 10 9 9 10 10 9 9 9 10 10 10 115
Buckland 9 9 10 10 9 9 10 10 10 9 9 9 113
submitted by noirargent to Boxing [link] [comments]


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